Friday, August 11, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 1979-08-11 - Knebworth Festival (CDM / Final Cut)

Led Zeppelin
August 11, 1979
Knebworth Festival
Stevenage, UK




Final Cut (Celebration Definitive Masters CDM-002)

101. The Song Remains the Same
102. Celebration Day
103. Black Dog
104. Nobody’s Fault But Mine
105. Over the Hills and Far Away
106. Misty Mountain Hop
107. Since I’ve Been Loving You
108. No Quarter
109. Hot Dog
110. The Rain Song

201. White Summer
202. Black Mountain Side
203. Kashmir
204. Trampled Underfoot
205. Sick Again
206. Achilles Last Stand
207. guitar solo/ tympani solo
208. In the Evenin

301. Stairway to Heaven
302. Rock & Roll
303. Whole Lotta Love
304. Communication Breakdown



Such was the belief in Led Zeppelin’s undiminished popularity that, when they booked their big UK come back for the Knebworth Festival in 1979, promoter Freddie Bannister took the unprecedented step in booking two concerts on consecutive weekends.  Whereas the first Knebworth show drew an estimated 100,000 people, the second drew only 40,000 (some sources put the number as high as 80,000) and the idea backfired on the promoter. 

Robert Plant in particular resented the almost universal criticism of the first weekend and his complaining during this show really spoils the mood.  However, between the two Knebworth shows, this is arguable the more artisically satisfying. 

It was the last of the four in 1979 and there are signs that the band were gaining more confidence.  They were supported on this day by New Barbarians, Todd Rundgren’s Utopia, Southside Johnny and The Asbury Jukes, The New Commander Cody Band, and Chas and Dave. 

Many audience recordings exist of the event, but in late 1999 the Celebration label premiered this almost complete, excellent quality stereo soundboard recording on Final Cut.  It was the label’s second release (after the Bonzo’s Birthday Presents soundboard fragment) and remains one of their best productions before they began to remasterd their tapes to death to produce utter garbage. 

Celebration use an excellent audience recording for “White Summer” and Plant’s closing comments at the end of the show.  There is such a dynamic timbre to the music and audience sounds that is unique to many soundboard recordings that, despite the re-releases, remains unsurpassed.  The discs are housed in a fatboy jewel case with many photos of the event in a cardboard slip cover.  The first edition is in gray and the second in brown, and both editions contain a four page insert and are limited edition. 

Since Celebration’s release there have been several other releases of this tape.  The earliest was Knebworth Festival (TCD-4-1,2) which tried to cut down on the lower frequencies.  Jelly Roll made a comeback five years after their last release with Knebworth Festival 1979 (JR-32/33/34) with increased volume and the PA problems removed. 

Empress Valley released Blind Date (EVSD-214-219) in 2002 and although the tape is complete, they “improve” the show by taking out the PA problems during “Over The Hills And Far Away.”  It is also lacking in the lower end. 

Watchtower issued Welcome To the 1979 Knebworth Festival, 11th  Of August (Watchtower WT 2002094/95/96) soon after Empress Valley in both a seven disc boxset with the first Knebworth show and a bonus disc from Earls Court and individually in jewel cases.  

After the opening songs Plant shows his bitterness at being slammed in the press after the first Knebworth show, saying, “Well, it didn’t rain, but it rained on us in the week from one or two sources, and we’re just gonna stick it right where it really belongs.”  It is immediately obvious that the emotion and intensity of the first week is lacking. 

“Over The Hills And Far Away” is ruined by a loud crackling in the PA system.  Page in particular sounds distracted during the solo and stumbles into the second half.  “What’s going on?” Plant asks.  “It must be the samosas” he jokes but the noises persist through “Misty Mountain Hop” which, “apart from a load of crackling featured Jonesy on narcissistic keyboards.”

“No Quarter” is fifteen minutes long and includes a masterful duet between Jones and Page in the middle section where there seems to be some telepathy between them proving this is one of the greatest live vehicles written by Led Zeppelin and it is a shame this would be the final live version. 

“Ten Years Gone” is dropped so Plant goes into the long introduction to the first new song of the set, saying, “In the neolithic caves in Peru they’ve been finding a lot of colored drawings on the walls, and along with the colored drawings they also found a new album cover. We’re managing to get the album out in about two weeks. As you’ve no doubt read the reviews, it’s tremendous. You can imagine. It’s called In Through the Out Door, which is one of the methods of entry that proves to be harder that one would originally expect.  And this is one of the tracks from it. It’s called…and we dedicate this to the Texas road crew, and all the people to be found in the sleazy hangouts around there…it’s called Hot Dog.”

“The Rain Song” is very strong and the tape picks up Jones playing some pretty and unique bass-lines in the middle of the piece.  The next portion of the set is occupied with some of their most adventurous songs of tours and journeys beginning with “White Summer.” 

Whether the thematic link was intentional or not, but “Kashmir,” “Trampled Underfoot,” “Sick Again” and “Achilles Last Stand” all deal with motion and adventures in foreign lands in one way or another.  They are performed well although “Sick Again” seems to puzzle the audience and “Achilles Last Stand” stumbles out of the gate and is generally sloppy.   

Everyone seems tires after “In The Evening” as Plant introduces the final song of the main set, saying, “it comes to the time now when we really got to thank you for hanging about for four years you English folk.  And you French people, for hanging about since ooh, I don’t know how long. I would like to thank everybody who’s come from everywhere to create part of the atmosphere that we’ve had. The other bands that we’ve had with us, Commander Cody. Good, good, good, good. Todd, Keith, and Ronny [Keith Richards and Ron Wood who opened for Zeppelin as the New Barbarians]. Peter Grant. Thanks everybody.” 

A tired version of “Stairway To Heaven” is played before they come back for the encores.  “Can you do the dinosaur rock?” Plant asks before “Rock And Roll.”  The new arrangement of “Whole Lotta Love” is much more tight and vicious this evening and the final encore is a quick version of “Communication Breakdown.” 

“It’s been great….We’ll see you very soon.  Don’t know about the Marquee, but somewhere soon.  See you later, bye” are Plant’s parting words.  For an historical piece this is a great document to have of this show, warts and all. 

Led Zeppelin - 1979-08-11 - Knebworth Festival (Blind Date - EVSD)

Led Zeppelin
August 11, 1979
Knebworth Festival
Stevenage, UK



Blind Date / Empress Valley (#EVSD 214~219)

101. Introduction (1:06)
102. The Song Remains The Same (5:09)
103. Celebration Day (3:32)
104. Out On The Tiles / Black Dog (5:29)
105. Nobody's Fault But Mine (6:04)
106. Over The Hills And Far Away (6:13)
107. Misty Mountain Hop (5:21)
108. Since I've Been Loving You (8:49)
109. No Quarter (15:16)

201. Hot Dog (4:44)
202. The Rain Song (7:51)
203. White Summer / Black Mountain Side (5:58)
204. Kashmir (9:15)
205. Trampled Underfoot (6:47)
206. Sick Again (5:11)
207. Achilles Last Stand (10:07)

301. Guitar Solo (6:39)
302. In The Evening (7:16)
303. Stairway To Heaven (14:27)
304. Rock And Roll (10:02)
305. Whole Lotta Love (10:47)
306. Communication Breakdown (5:35)

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 1975-03-21 - Seattle, WA (Soundboard / dadgad)

Led Zeppelin
March 21, 1975
Seattle Center Coliseum
Seattle, WA



01. Rock and Roll
02. Sick Again
03. Over the Hills and Far Away
04. In My Time of Dying
05. The Song Remains the Same
06. The Rain Song
07. Kashmir
08. No Quarter
09. Since I've Been Loving You
10. Trampled Underfoot
11. Moby Dick
12. Dazed and Confused
 - For What its Worth
 - Woodstock
 - I Shot the Sheriff
13. Stairway to Heaven
14. Whole Lotta Love
 - The Crunge
 - Lickin' Stick
 - Ain't It Funky Now
15. Out on the Tiles (intro)/Black Dog
16. Communication Breakdown
17. Heartbreaker

"Deus Ex Machina" (EVSD) SBD source, remastered and retracked

dadgad prod.




Wednesday, August 02, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 1975-03-21 - Seattle, WA (Deus Ex Machina / EVSD)

Led Zeppelin
March 21, 1975
Seattle Center Coliseum
Seattle, WA



Deus Ex Machina / EVSD

Soundboard just released end July

01. Rock And Roll
02. Sick Again
03. Over The Hills And Far Away
04. In My Time Of Dying
05. The Song Remains The Same
06. The Rain Song
07. Kashmir
08. No Quarter
09. Since I've Been Loving You
10. Trampled Underfoot
11. Moby Dick
12. Dazed And Confused
13. Stairway To Heaven
14. Whole Lotta Love
15. Black Dog
16. Communication Breakdown
17. Heartbreaker

This show is one of the best from the 1975 tour. The entire show and length are impressive, but what makes this so memorable are the two epics. No Quarter is 30 minutes long and one of the best ever. But here, we have the second to last longest ever Dazed And Confused, clocking in at 45 minutes and it is the best one ever (the other one, clocks at 46, can be found on the last LA date, on March 27th). It moves through several sections and has many dynamic contrasts to keep it interesting throughout ... it doesn't seem like 45 minutes.


The tape begins with a stage announcement asking the crowd not to light any matches during the show or the house lights will be brought up, ruining the light show. The crowd erupts as Rock and Roll crashes into motion. Following Sick Again, Plant announces "well, we went across the border, it was alright, but it's much better back here." Page blazes through an excellent guitar solo during Over the Hills and Far Away. As the song ends, Plant tells the crowd "there's one demand that I'd like to make apart from that you enjoy what we're doin', and that is that you don't sway around too much at the front because somebody might get hurt." In My Time of Dying is an intense sonic assault. Jones's fingers dance across the fretboard as Page tears through the frantic guitar solos during The Song Remains the Same. The Rain Song is excellent.

Page plays a bit of White Summer as Plant dedicates a powerful Kashmir to "everybody who we met in Seattle this time who's been a groove and a gas." No Quarter is introduced as "a journey with more somber intonations." Jones delivers a highly dramatic piano solo which includes hints of Georgia on My Mind. The instrumental section features an epic guitar solo from Page. Jones's playing becomes a bit erratic toward the end. Page solos wildly during the outro. An outstanding performance, one of the best thus far. As the song ends, Plant announces "there's one song that we've done twice in... I suppose since we got ripped off for all that bread in New York ages ago, and because we really dig playin' here, for no other reason we're gonna do it again now" before the second rare appearance of Since I've Been Loving You in 1975. Page blazes through a blistering guitar solo. A fantastic performance. Trampled Underfoot features an aggressive guitar solo from Page. Plant repeatedly exclaims "see saw, knock on my door, gonna swing!" As the song ends, he says "with just a little bit of Gallows Pole thrown in."

Following a marathon Moby Dick, Plant tells the crowd "there's a little bit of a discrepancy about a guitar and a man who's being held by the police and all sorts of things, quite a story going on behind the scenes" before dedicating Dazed and Confused to "the innocent party" and "the difference and the balances between law and order." Page shreds wildly during the lead-in to the bow solo. The Woodstock interlude has been transformed into an amazingly haunting rendition of For What it's Worth. The instrumental machinery is in full swing during the frenzied guitar solo/workout section. Page is absolutely on fire, soloing furiously as Bonzo and Jones hammer along at a frantic pace. The epic journey reaches its peak during the wildly cacophonous outro jam. An utterly devastating performance, one of the best thus far. And at forty minutes in length, one of the longest as well.

Page hints at Louie Louie as Plant offers the crowd a history lesson on famous Seattle musicians before dedicating Stairway to Heaven to "the amount of work that Jimi Hendrix gave... and the amount of inspiration that he gave everybody in the business." Page slowly builds tension before erupting in a furious cascade of notes during the dynamic guitar solo. The final verse is explosive. Whole Lotta Love includes another excellent rendition of The Crunge prior to the funky theramin freakout, which is punctuated by a devastatingly heavy finale. Plant's banshee wails threaten to destroy the taper's equipment during a blistering Black Dog.  A quick and dirty Communication Breakdown is linked nonstop with Heartbreaker. Page blazes through the guitar solos. As the band leaves the stage, Plant announces "thank you very much, we've had a great time... you've been fantastic... Seattle, goodnight!" A truly amazing marathon performance. Must hear.

Monday, July 31, 2017

U2 - 2017-05-14 - Seattle, WA (EVSD)

U2
May 14, 2017 
Century Link Field
Seattle, WA 




Take The Fucking Roof Off! / EVSD

01. Opening
02. Sunday Bloody Sunday
03. New Year's Day
04. A Sort Of Homecoming
05. Bad
06. Pride (In The Name Of Love)
07. Where The Streets Have No Name
08. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For
09. With Or Without You
10. Bullet The Blue Sky
11. Running To Stand Still
12. Red Hill Mining Town
13. In God's Country
14. Trip Through Your Wires
15. One Tree Hill
16. Exit
17. Mothers Of The Disappeared
18. Beautiful Day
19. Elevation
20. Ultra Violet (Light My Way)
21. One
22. Miss Sarajevo
23. The Little Things That Give You Away
24. I Will Follow

Recorded on the second night of the ‘Joshua Tree’ anniversary tour, the follow up to EV’s ‘Thirty Years And I Still Can’t Play Harmonica‘ is another of those brilliant audience / IEM matrix releases that we’ve become accustomed to over the past few years. The sound of this set is the same as the first set, the taper using his technical expertise and the best audience recordings to bump up the atmosphere in the playback. The playback is crisp and almost like listening to a digital radio broadcast maybe a little better! Effort has been made to stifle the count-in’s from the soundboard checking in the band to their parts – It was one of the things that took away from ‘Thirty Years ..’ for me but by squeezing these out, the taper has made a much easier listen. The ones that are left in just fit a little more naturally.

The set list doesn’t differ much from the first evening – it’s a pretty static list though ‘MLK’ is replaced by ‘Bad’ in the the first night starchiness has been shaken out and Bono returns to grabbing other’s lyrics from out of the air and bolting them on to the bands songs, vamping as he sees fit. You also know the role by now – The album is bookended by a various few greatest hits by the band with the mighty 1987 album being played out in full. Electronic advances and changes to eras being as they are, the sound of the band is a little less brougeish punk and a little more polished stadium rock.

Highlights from the set include Bono’s acapella rendering of Simon and Garfunkel’s “America” that bridges ‘A Sort Of Home Coming’ and ‘Bad’, returning at the very end to brush in an exhilarating ‘Pride’ which in turns leads in to a punching, ‘Where The Streets Have No Name’. The audience mix reveals a little too much before ‘With Or Without You’ as a female audience member shouts to her companion “You know this one?”, it’s either an in joke, a reference to the TV show “Friends” or a forehead slappingly behind member of the human race who has turned up not knowing this track, the rest of the audience certainly do and play with an aural mexican-wave following Bono’s vocals.

An most beautiful ‘Red Hill Mining Town’ where the crowd swoon along. ‘Exit’ twins itself with ‘Wise Blood’ and even a chant of ‘Eenie Meenie Miny Mo’ which Bono sets on fire with passion followed by a heart melting, ‘Mothers Of The Disappeared’ before which, Bono shouts out to Eddie Vedder who appears to be in the audience.

But after all this, we really can’t not include Bono’s giddy everyman attitude between tracks, his klutzy fumbling before ‘Trip Through Your Wires’ as he falls over his words and adds a little depreciation to his harp playing (Which is still brilliant) is still rather endearing.

The band return for their encores with a thrilling ‘Beautiful Day’ with a hint to The Who’s ‘Love Reign O’er Me’ before the sticky grunge-pop of ‘Elevation’.

‘Ultra Violet’ is announced as being dedicated to the women that the band know, their mothers, daughters and the women of the audience, while Bill and Melinda Gates are applauded at the end of the track for their charitable works, this also coincides with a tribute to the companies who have joined the fight against aids while, ‘One’ is dedicated in the memory of David Wojnarowicz.

‘The Little Things That Give You Away’ rounds of the show nicely, grand and cinematic, it paves the way nicely for the hyper-excitement chug of ‘I Will Follow’, giving the audience and band a chance to, as Bono requests, “Blow the fucking roof off’.

The 2 disk set is neatly tied in to the same aesthetics that also made ’30 Years ..’ a joy to hold, the colours and design remain the same but obviously the name has changed. Thick stock cardboard, gatefold sleeve with an Obi-Strip for authenticity (And, one suspects, to add a little touch of class).

I actually prefer this over the first night, the set seems a little tighter if looser with no let up to the energy from the band. It looses so many of those obtrusive count-ins too, which was the crux of the first set. Obviously U2 fans will want to collect the set but if you were (or are) waiting for that definitive show for your collection, despite the fact that we’re only the second one in, I’d strongly recommend this release.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (Lifetime Guarantee Revisited - EVSD)

Led Zeppelin 
December 30, 1968 
Gonzaga University 
Spokane, WA 




Lifetime Guarantee Revisited (EVSD)

01. The Train Kept A Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You
04. Dazed And Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times
07. Pat's Delight


The earliest live Led Zeppelin audience recording has been released many times before over the past twenty or so years.  The show was taped by the promoter of the show and the levels were set high making it rather distorted at the beginning.  Thankfully after the initial blast it clears up and it becomes a very good and listenable, perfectly enjoyable document.  It first surfaced on vinyl on Alpha And Omega (Rock Solid Records RSR 141) where the show (minus “Dazed And Confused” and “White Summer”) were paired with the July 24th, 1977 Oakland show. 

This title was also included in The Final Option box set.  On compact disc it can be found on Gonzaga 1968, Gonzaga ’68 (Capricorn CR-2031E), Capricorn’s copy Gonzaga ’68 (So Fucking What), and Empress Valley’s first release Lifetime Guarantee (EV 141) released in the spring of 2002.  EV claim to use the master cassette which is pictured on the sleeve, and their version runs at the correct speed, is much cleaner sounding and is more complete. 

Tarantura issued a version of this show on Yardbirds Fame (TCD – 69) which was almost universally panned by collectors as being among the worst ever issued.  Empress Valley’s latest release Lifetime Guarantee Revisited presents the show in both an audio and a DVDA format.  The volume of the tape has been amplified a little bit and is a bit more clear than the earlier edition making it the best available version in existence.

Spokane is the fifth show on Zeppelin’s first tour and the only live tape from 1968 in circulation.  Opening for Vanilla Fudge, this show is a bit more than three months removed from their live debut in September and nine months from the Yardbirds’ Anderson Theater show recorded in March and released on Live Yardbirds!  Featuring Jimmy Page.  The set list for both began with “Train Kept a Rollin’,” focuses upon “Dazed And Confused” and “White Summer,” and contains a twelve minute rave by the end (“I’m A Man” and “How Many More Times.”) 

The opening song is played deliberately as The Yardbirds did, before Zeppelin would quicken the tempo in later performances.  The guitar disappears about a minute into the song and it take a bit of time before Page’s guitar is fixed before he comes back in.  

After the second song Plant says, “good evening from Led Zeppelin.  You won’t believe this but I don’t think either ourselves or our equipment is quite used to the temperature.  It’s taken about three hours of gas stoves over the equipment before we could get it together.  Let’s see if we can keep it going.  This is a thing by Garnett Mimms of all people, called ‘As Long As I Have You.'”  This early version of their epic improvisational piece is eight minutes long but includes the “Fresh Garbage” reference.

“We’re all dying.  You’ve got flu and things here” Plant says before he mentions the first album coming out in three weeks. 

“Dazed And Confused” is very close to the studio track with little improvisation in the middle, and this is followed by “White Summer.”  This version is two minutes longer than what Page played in the springtime, but is a rare version where he only plays the old track with no reference to “Black Mountain Side.” 

“How Many More Times” doesn’t have the Bolero section, but has a lot of call and response between Page and Plant, “The Hunter,” and another Page violin bow on guitar solo.  The show strangely ends with the Bonham’s drum solo “Pat’s Delight.”  The tape cuts out right after the return to the main theme, leading to speculation if another song were played that night such as “Communication Breakdown.” 


The second disc is a DVDA of the same tape and again the sound quality is very good.  Each song is accompanied by a picture from the era. 

This is packaged in a double slimline jewel case with full color inserts with photos from the early years of Zeppelin.  Thankfully they didn’t use the inconvenient big plastic cases they use for their other DVDA releases.  Some collectors are speculating Empress Valley released this in direct competition with Tarantura’s release from some months back.  If that is the case, EV is still the best version of this fascinating tape available and since this one is very reasonably priced makes it worth acquiring.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (EVSD)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA




Lifetime Guarantee / EVSD

01. The Train Kept A Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You (includes Fresh Garbage,Shake,Mockingbird)
04. Dazed & Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Years/Times (includes The Hunter)
07. Pat's Delight

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (Tarantura)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA




Yardbirds Fame / Tarantura


01. Train Kept-A-Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You
04. Dazed And Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times
07. Pat's Delight

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (Capricorn)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA




"Gonzaga '68"
Capricorn

01. Train Kept a Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You (medley: Fresh Garbage, Shake, Hush)
04. Dazed and Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times (inc. the Hunter)
07. Pat's Delight

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (Zeppelin Digital)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga Universty
Spokane, WA




Zeppelin Digital Volume 5


01. Train Kept a Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You (medley: Fresh Garbage, Shake, Hush)
04. Dazed and Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times (inc. the Hunter)
07. Pat's Delight

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (dadgad)

Led Zeppelin 
1968-12-30 
Gonzaga University
Kennedy Pavillion
Spokane, WA




Unknown Gen Analogue to Digital Audience Source.

01. The Train Kept A Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You Baby
03. As long As I Have You
04. Dazed And Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times
07. Pat's Delight

This might surprise many of you but I'll leave any final judgement to the listeners.
I can track the trade back to two recipients before me:
?>Japan>Poland>me

Phase and speed corrected, song by song, the pitch and speed varies throughout all the original tape
especially from the beginning up to White Summer where it almost levels until the end.

Mastered with  AACS6, tracked with CD Wave Editor.

Unaltered sound.

dadgad prod.

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (Master Clone)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA



Master Clone

01. Train Kept A-Rollin
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You
04. Dazed And Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times (With The Hunter)
07. Pat's Delight


KRW_CO

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (Magic Bus)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA



Alpha & Omega: Sounds Of The Underground
(Magic Bus Box)

01. The Train Kept A Rollin'
02. I Can't Quit You Baby
03. As Long As I Have You / Fresh Garbage / Mockingbird
04. Dazed And Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times / The Hunter
07. Pat's Delight

Led Zeppelin - 1968-12-30 - Spokane, WA (1st Gen)

Led Zeppelin
December 30, 1968
Gonzaga University
Spokane, WA


Audience Recording
Master > Cassette > DAT

01. Train Kept a Rollin
02. I Can't Quit You
03. As Long As I Have You
04. Dazed and Confused
05. White Summer
06. How Many More Times
07. Pat's Delight

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 2017 - History Lesson (DVD Box)

Led Zeppelin
2017
History Lesson





This release contains every known clip of Led Zeppelin on/off stage ranging from 1969-1980, as well as every reunion performance (besides 02), promo videos, post Zeppelin interviews, and adds. While the majority of the footage has already circulated (with the  exception of the Peter Grant interview from 1971, which I have never seen before, and non-YouTube versions of Landover and Greensboro 1977), the following clips have been upgraded, most being transferred from their original master reels:

-New York 1973.07.28
-New York 1975.02.07
-Philiadelphia 1975.02.08
-Landover 1975.02.10
-Seattle 1975.03.17
-Seattle 1975.03.21
-Chicago 1977.04.10
-Los Angeles 1977.06.22
-Los Angeles 1977.06.26
-Knebworth 1979.08.04

Track Listing:


Disc Lengths:
Disc 1 - 1969-1971 (2:47:02)
Disc 2 - 1972-1973 (2:30:25)
Disc 3 - 1975 (2:57:02)
Disc 4 - 1977 (2:31:41)
Disc 5 - 1977-1980 (3:06:38)
Disc 6 - 1985-2016 (3:18:38)
Bonus Disc - 1958-1968 (1:13:09)




Sunday, June 18, 2017

Pink Floyd - 1970-11-27 - Hannover (Trip Through Germany / EAT 170-171)

Pink Floyd
November 11, 1970
Niedersachsenhalle
Hannover 





Trip Through Germany
Eat A Peach / EAT 170-171

101. Astronomy Domine
102. Fat Old Sun
103. Cymbaline
104. Corrosion In The Pink Room / Several Species Of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together In A Cave And Grooving With A Pict
105. The Embryo / Several Species Of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together In A Cave And Grooving With A Pict (Reprise)

201. Atom Heart Mother
1. Father’s Shout
2. Breast Milky
3. Mother Fore
4. Funky Dung
5. Mind Your Throats Please
6. Remergence
202. Several Species Of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together In A Cave And Grooving With A Pict tease / Green Is The Colour
203. Careful With That Axe Eugene
204. Introduction
205. Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun
206. Final Speech
207. A Saucerful Of Secrets
1. Something Else
2. Syncopated Pandemonium
3. Storm Signal
4. Celestial Voices


Over the past few years there has been a restructuring of thought when recordings of Pink Floyd culled from their German / European dates in November 1970 are concerned. First off there is an old vinyl bootleg called Pictures Of Pink Floyd Vol 1 (Topsound 70001) and Vol 2 (Topsound 10022), while the cover may eluded to the fact that it was from a USA concert in April 1970, keen listeners easily deduced it was not from then but from Europe in late 1970 due to song structures, mainly of Fat Old Sun and Atom Heart Mother. There was a comment made by Roger “My Lords, ladies and gentlemen, Mr Nicholas Mason”, thus this recording was attributed to Gothenburg, Sweden as supposedly there were members of the Swedish royal family in attendance at that concert. Since the POPF featured a unique piece of music referred to as Corrosion, most also believed that the recording was done within a few days time of another concert, Hamburg Nov 14, 1970, that contained the same piece of music, so the recording for many years was referred to as Gothenburg.

As time goes on, somehow “new” recordings surface, and sometimes throw a wrench in the works, such is the case with the three fragmented recordings that surfaced in 2012 and released by Sigma as In Germany 1970-1971 (Sigma 71). This title was sourced from a cassette featuring snippets of three different concerts, Hamburg – November 14, 1970, Hannover – November 27, 1970 and Munster, Germany – February 24, 1971. Well, after close examination, the music referred to as Hamburg did not match the circulating recording for that date, see Corrosion (Sirene 235), then it was discovered that the material dated Hannover matched the circulating recording Hamburg. An additional piece of the puzzle came into the picture in mid 2016 when a recording for the Gothenburg – November 11, 1970 concert surfaced on Gothenburg 1970 (Sigma 156).

Based upon all this new information, the problem would be what to do with the Pictures Of Pink Floyd recording. After an examination of the dates from the tour that had no known recording, it was deduced it had to be from Saarbrucken – November 28, 1970. And this does make sense based upon the piece known as Corrosion, there are three know versions of this song in circulation and all three are very similar, most believe that they were recorded close together, it would not make sense if they were weeks apart. The third version you ask? It was recorded for French TV at the conclusion of this tour on December 5, 1970.

So here is what has been restructured:

Gothenburg, Novermber 11, 1970 – Gothenburg 1970 (Sigma 156)

Hamburg, Germany, November 14, 1970 – In Germany 1970-1971 (Sigma 71)

Hannover, Germany, November 27, 1970 – Corrosion (Sirene 235), In Germany 1970-1971 (Sigma 71), Trip Through Germany (Eat A Peach EAT 170/171)

Saarbrucken, Germany, November 28, 1970 – Pictures Of Pink Floyd (Topsound 70001 / 10022)

Now we have that out of the way, let’s take a look at this new title from the Eat A Peach label of the Hannover – November 27, 1970 concert. The November tour through Europe is, for me, a high point in the Floyd’s early touring career, many of the concerts exist on and circulate either through bootlegs or in trading circles and are available for our listening enjoyment, and there is much to be enjoyed. After the somewhat rudderless late 60’s, the band seemed to have found direction largely thanks to their draw as a live act. This gave them the ability to gel together with David Gilmour and write as a unit, and their creativity would culminate with a series of incredible records, Ummagumma, More, Atom Heart Mother, and Meddle. For me the studio records are like titles of chapters, the real text is in the live recordings, and for me it gets no better than 1970.

The recording from Hannover, originally thought to be Hamburg, has circulated for years and is an essential piece to the early Floyd puzzle, as intriguing as Birmingham – February 11, 1970 and Sheffield – December 22, 1970 as it contains a very unique performance. Not only do we get one of three versions of Corrosion aka Libest Spacement Monitor but also Roger does several incredible “pict” rants based upon his piece, Several Species Of Small Furry Animals Gathered Together In A Cave And Grooving With A Pict from the Ummagumma record. The performances from this period found the band playing in small halls and most have an intimate atmosphere, and Roger is in an interesting mood and seems to have an almost open dialogue with the audience, a rather rambunctious group of young fanatical German Floyd fans.

The recording falls into the very good range, just slightly distant with all instruments and vocals clearly heard. To my ears it sounds as if the Peach folks have slightly increased the volume making the small amount of tape hiss just a bit louder, I am basing this on the 2003 transfer of the Reel to Reel 3 3/4 ips referred to as T136 that is considered the lowest generation and best source in circulation. What this tape has over the old Sirene Corrosion title is a warm and natural sounding listening experience and it runs at the correct speed, an is just a hair longer as well. While I fully acknowledge that mastering of these old tapes tends to follow ones tastes, it does seem that the trend is going for a more natural sound of what the recording actually sounds like versus trying to achieve a bright and brittle sound free of hiss that has no soul to it.

It boils down to this, I like this new release. The tape hiss does not bother me and the recording sounds great and is quite enjoyable, add this together with a sublime performance, one of the best from 1970 and you get a winner. I fully agree some may not like the mastering of any title, but this is a forum to discuss opinions on a titles merits so those who do not have a particular recording can make a determination of whether it is worth their investment or not. Until the master tape of this recording or the full recording found on In Germany 1970-1971 surfaces, this new title from Eat A Peach is an acceptable alternative to the long out of print Sirene title and is a nice title to have. The packaging is simple mini LP style jacket with CD sleeves and inserts all having great photos from the era, there are nice liner notes from the Lazy Goalkeeper.

Pink Floyd - 1970-01-18 - Croydon (Leaders Of The Underground / EAT 119-120)

Pink Floyd
January 18, 1970
Fairfield Hall
Croydon 



Leaders Of The Underground
Eat A Peach / EAT 119-120

101. Careful With That Axe Eugene
102. The Embryo (Early Version)
103. Main Theme From 'More' (Early Version)
104. Biding My Time
105. A Saucerful Of Secrets

201. The Violent Sequence
202. Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun
203. Astronomy Domine
204. The Amazing Pudding (AKA Atom Heart Mother Early Version)

After the arrival of David Gilmour and the departure of Syd Barrett, the Pink Floyd were forced to begin a musical transformation. Barrett was their chief song writer and front man, much of these duties would to Roger Waters and Richard Wright, subsequent singles from this time period shows a lack of direction from earlier songs that topped the British music charts. The band moved away from singles and towards more LP oriented themes, they also were much in demand as a live act, gone was the psychedelic freak outs and the band moved into college circuits where like minded students would intently listen to this new music. 1969 and 1970 were pivotal years for the band, they found that concept based themes could be personally rewarding and quite popular, The Man and The Journey concept concerts were well received. Their work on film soundtracks like Zabriskie Point and More would also provide a sort of testing ground to venture into other areas outside an official record and coupled with such albums as A Saucerful Of Secrets and Ummagumma, made for a very prolific period.

Not wanting to stick with concept performances the band were beginning to experiment with their live set and in early 1970 the band would play some of the most adventurous sets of songs, taking existing crowd favorites and expanding with newer music. This was short lived as the band would soon focus on a collection of songs that would form the basis for their sets for the next two years, it was this set of songs and consistent touring where themes and ideas would evolve into some of the greatest music the band would record. There are three very important recordings in circulation, Feb 11 Birmingham (Atomic Heartbeat In The Hall – Godfatherecords 786/787), Paris Jan 23 (Household Objects In Paris – Godfatherecords GR 897/868, The Man In Paris – Sigma 89) and Croydon Jan 18, the subject of this new release. The recording from Croydon is good, it has circulated for years in trading circles, the master tape has never circulated and the best that does are a couple generations from that tape. Apparently the taper would set up a stall at a record fair and sell copies of his recordings on cheap media, so the sound is not as good as it could be. As stated the sound is good, there is tape hiss present as well as some distortion in loud parts and while the instruments and vocals can be heard the recording lacks clarity. It is also sadly incomplete as to conserve tape the taper would pause the machine to save tape. For years the sequence was the subject of much debate with only news paper reviews to give some clues, finally a person who attended the concert wrote down the set lists at that time and confirmed the sequence of songs on this release are correct, only thing missing is the encore of Intestellar Overdrive!

The first disc begins with Careful With That Axe, Eugene, for a first song it is clear and well defined, clocking in at about 11 minutes it is a focused and excellent version of the song, not as intense as latter versions but certainly an important song in the bands repertoire. Embyro is still in its infancy, it is similar to the recording from the BBC December 1968, you can hear the band incorporating the more bluesy feel into it, something that would be fully in place less than a month later in Birmingham, Dave plays quite a bit of slide guitar during the song. The middle section features the band playing around with different melodies and themes as if simply seeing what works or is interesting. Main Theme From More is great live, it just kind of bobs along, the middle section features some interesting growls or grunts from Roger and you can hear some almost Embryo type jamming in the middle. What is apparent is how well played the song is giving it was very short lived in the band live set. Biding My Time aka Afternoon was part of the suite known as The Man from 1969’s concept concerts and is always an interesting song live. It sounds as if it could be played anywhere from London to New Orleans, Richard Wright would play trombone giving a jazzy feel but soon afterwards Gilmour plays a wonderful blues inspired solo as the song starts to really cook. More than likely A Saucerful Of Secrets is the final song from the first set, clocking in at 17 minutes it is a typically wonderful and mysterious version, the Celestial Voices ending seems to be too much for the recording device as it gets a bit distorted yet adds to the corrosive nature of the song.

The second disc and set begins with The Violent Sequence, it starts with a sort of Heartbeat Pigmeat meets Sysyphus which morphs into a sort of avant garde jazz variation of the percussive beat of the song before moving into the Richard Wright piano which would become Us And Them two years later. This is a very adventurous and at times meandering piece of music, given the rarity of the piece and the fact that the band would ultimately reject it for the stage make for a unique listening experience. A nice long Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun and Astronomy Domine follows, both typical for the era and its obvious that both are audience favorites with the former really starting to reach for the cosmos, gentle yet deliberate. The last thing that makes this tape absolutely essential for Floyd enthusiasts is the last song, the first known recording of what would later be titled as Atom Heart Mother. It is believed that the previous night’s concert in Hull, England was its live debut, yet there is no recording from that performance. The framework of the song is here, it lacks a more focused structure and lacks some of the dynamics that would continue to evolve over the next couple months, one of the more interesting things is Nick Mason’s drum solo section. The recording cuts at its conclusion and the last three minutes is a repeat from the beginning section done as part of a Yeeshkull project restoration of this concert, done so well if you did not know it was there, you never would’ve known.

The packaging is typical Eat A Peach, mini LP sleeve with a collage of live shots from the period. The inner CD sleeves have live and posed shots, the one of Waters seated at a table with a couple of cats glancing out a window in nice, and have the song titles for each cd listed. There is an insert with liner notes from The Lazy Goalkeeper that is well written, simply another well sought out release. As with their The Man And The Journey set, it is obvious Eat A Peach is committed to releasing well thought out and relevant Pink Floyd material, material that deserves such lovingly assembled sets such as this. Oh yeah, the title of this comes from Roy Shipston’s review of this concert in Disc magazine, “Pink Floyd Leaders of the underground”.

U2 - 1987-09-28 - New York City, NY (New York 928 / MC036)

U2
September 28, 1987
Madison Square Garden 
New York City, NY



New York 928
MoonChild Records - MC036
Soundboard

01. Where The Streets Have No Name
02. I Will Follow
03. Trip Through Your Wires
04. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For / Exodus (snippet)
05. MLK
06. The Unforgettable Fire
07. Bullet The Blue Sky
08. Running To Stand Still
09. In God's Country
10. Sunday Bloody Sunday
11. Exit / Van Morrison's Gloria (snippet)
12. Help
13. Bad
14. October
15. New Year's Day
16. Pride (In The Name Of Love)
17. With Or Without You
18. Party Girl
19. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For
20. Spanish Eyes
21. 40


The second performance of I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For is with the New Voices Of Freedom gospel choir.

U2 - 1987-09-22 - Foxboro, MA (Foxboro 922 / MC035)

U2
September 22, 1987
Foxboro Stadium
Foxboro, MA 




Foxboro 922
MoonChild Records - MC035
Soundboard

01. Stand By Me
02. Where The Streets Have No Name
03. I Will Follow
04. Trip Through Your Wires
05. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For
06. The Unforgettable Fire
07. Bullet The Blue Sky
08. Running To Stand Still
09. Exit / Van Morrison's Gloria (snippet)
10. Sunday Bloody Sunday
11. Help
12. Helter Skelter
13. Bad / Walk On The Wild Side (snippet)
14. October
15. New Year's Day
16. Pride (In The Name Of Love)
17. One Tree Hill
18. With Or Without You
19. 40

Bono's arm is in a sling after dislocating his shoulder two nights earlier in Washington DC. It restricts his movement somewhat, but he has to wear it for the next few weeks. The first show without the sling is not until 20 October 1987 in Iowa City.

U2 - 1987-09-17 - Boston, MA (Boston 917 / MC034)

U2
September 17, 1987
Boston Garden
Boston, MA 



Boston 917
Moonchild Records - MC034
Soundboard

01. Opening
02. Bullet The Blue Sky
03. Where The Streets Have No Name
04. I Will Follow / Don't Let Me Down (snippet)
05. Trip Through Your Wires
06. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For / Exodus (snippet)
07. People Get Ready
08. The Unforgettable Fire
09. Exit
10. Silver And Gold
11. In God's Country
12. Sunday Bloody Sunday
13. Help
14. Bad
15. Running To Stand Still
16. New Year's Day
17. Pride (In The Name Of Love)
18. One Tree Hill
19. With Or Without You
20. Party Girl
21. 40

During I Will Follow, U2's own concert lighting fails and much of the show is played with the house lights on.

U2 - 1987-05-16 - East Rutherford, NJ (East Rutherford 516 / MC033)

U2
May 16, 1987
Brendan Byrne Arena
East Rutherford, NJ 



East Rutherford 516
Moonchild Records MC033

01. Stand By Me
02. Pride (In The Name Of Love)
03. MLK
04. The Unforgettable Fire
05. Bullet The Blue Sky
06. Running To Stand Still
07. Sunday Bloody Sunday
08. Exit / Van Morrison's Gloria (snippet)
09. In God's Country
10. Trip Through Your Wires
11. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For
12. The Electric Co. / Light My Fire (snippet) / Break On Through (snippet)
13. Springhill Mining Disaster
14. New Year's Day
15. Gloria
16. Bad
17. Where The Streets Have No Name
18. I Will Follow
19. With Or Without You / Shine Like Stars (snippet) / Love Will Tear Us Apart (snippet)
20. 40

U2 - 1987-05-15 - East Rutherford, NJ (East Rutherford 515 / MC032)

U2
May 15, 1987
Brendan Byrne Arena 
East Rutherford, NJ



East Rutherford 515
Moonchild Records MC032

01. Where The Streets Have No Name
02. I Will Follow
03. Trip Through Your Wires
04. People Get Ready
05. I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For
06. MLK
07. The Unforgettable Fire
08. Bullet The Blue Sky
09. Running To Stand Still
10. Exit / Riders On The Storm (snippet)
11. In God's Country
12. Sunday Bloody Sunday
13. Maggie's Farm / Cold Turkey (snippet) / School's Out (snippet)
14. C'mon Everybody
15. Trip Through Your Wires
16. Bad / Ruby Tuesday (snippet) / Sympathy For The Devil (snippet)
17. October
18. Springhill Mining Disaster
19. New Year's Day
20. Pride (In The Name Of Love)
21. With Or Without You / Shine Like Stars (snippet)
22. Gloria
23. 40

Bono felt that Trip Through Your Wires was performed so badly the first time that he got the band to do it again later in the main set.

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 2017 - Destroyer 40th Anniversary Edition

Led Zeppelin 
2017
Destroyer 40th Anniversary Edition 



Led Zeppelin
April 27, 1977
Richfield Coliseum
Cleveland, OH

Destroyer 40th Anniversary
EVSD 503-505
Soundboard



101. The Song Remains the Same
102. The Rover (introduction) / Sick Again
103. Nobody's Fault But Mine
104. In My Time of Dying
105. Since I've Been Loving You
106. No Quarter

201. Ten Years Gone
202. The Battle of Evermore
203. Going To California
204. Black Country Woman
205. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
206. White Summer
207. Black Mountain Side
208. Kashmir

301. Moby Dick
302. Guitar Solo
303. Achilles Last Stand
304. Stairway To Heaven
305. Rock and Roll
306. Trampled Underfoot

Review: LED ZEPPELIN – The Coliseum – April 27

It took those over two years to do it, but Led Zeppelin finally reached a Cleveland area stage once again last Wednesday night at the Coliseum. This show in particular, as well as their current tour in general, is nothing less than a re-assertion of their status among the Rolling Stones, Who and any other acknowledged deities of rock. It presents a challenge – as well as a set of standards to equal – to new wave heroes such as Aerosmith, Frampton and Blue Oyster Cult.

Zeppelin’s three-hour set passed with flying colors my personal shorthand estimation of a concert’s quality. It didn’t seem that long. The amount of material played, the musicianship involved, and the internal and external (special effects) manifestations of their music merged into an impressive, at time awe-inspiring, whole. The width of styles, moods and atmosphere, paired with consistent authenticity, crossed one of the widest spectrum of which any current combo seems capable.

Zeppelin’s show,  considerably revamped since their ’75 appearance in the same arena, was in general an effective mix of blues-ended structures such as In My Time of Dying, Nobody’s Fault But Mine and Since I’ve Been Loving You. The maximum amount of instrumental stretching-out however came on No Quarter. Working from both electric and acoustic pianos, John Paul Jones again impressed with his general versatility. Jimmy Page later joined in for what to me was his apogee of an evening’s worth of standout soloing. It was one of the best rock jams I’ve ever witnessed.

About midway through, Zep revived something they haven’t done in concert since the early 70s – an acoustic set. The founders and main perpetrators of the heavy metal music form sat themselves down and ran through delightful versions of Battle of Evermore, Going to California and Black Country Woman, even reviving the rockabilly Bron-Y-Aur Stomp from Led Zeppelin III (with Jones on stand-up bass).

Some more electrically oriented playing led into the visual highlight of the evening; a rotating, smoke-filled laser light cone surrounded Page as he spun out his famed violin bow work, with lasers behind him shooting arrow-straight beams at the ceiling at well-timed intervals. The show wound up with more conventional crowd-pleasers such as Kashmir and the Zeppelin signature song, Stairway to Heaven (with the biggest mirrored ball in rockdom used to wind it up.

John Bonham consistently kicked ass on drums, Robert Plant was 100 percent improved in voice and stage demeanor  since their last time here, and a warm, lucid in-group chemistry projected even across the Coliseum’s vast terrains. A surprisingly sedate and mature crowd did their part to create something I had previously thought was unique to small-hall presentations – a general warmness and intimacy of feeling emanating from the band and its reception by the listeners. It’s an attitude much more difficult to project over 20,000 seats than it is over 3,000. Such was the strength of Led Zeppelin’s performance, an in-person proof of why they still rank as one of the top viewing experiences in rock.

(C. Michalski / Scene April 1977)


This show gets criticized a lot, but it is really a good show, with lots of energy and intensity. The playing is great and the versions of Kashmir, Achilles Last Stand, and Ten Years Gone are exceptional, as is No Quarter. A really enthusiastic crowd feeds off of Zeppelin's energy, making for a memorable show. Plant sometimes complaining of monitor problems, especially during the acoustic set.


The soundboard for Led Zeppelin’s April 27th, 1977 show in Cleveland first surfaced on vinyl in the 1980’s on the European release Destroyer (DRGM 505), listed as being from Seattle and packaged in a color jacket with a picture of Page on the cover.  This was copied in the U.S. with the same title and matrix number but comes packaged in a plastic carrying case and the tape has a different mastering which many consider inferior, and releases have the songs out of proper sequence.  The Swingin’ Pig issued the four LP set Destroyer and other vinyl titles released in the late eighties include Sweet Jelly Roll (Rock Solid Records), Nobody’s Fault But Mine (Sad Song) and Hard Way To Heaven (UNI), which is incomplete and includes the Live Aid set.

When CDs first began to be manufactured this was one of the very first tapes to come out.  The Swingin’ Pig copied their vinyl release on Destroyer (TSP-CD-059-2), a 2CD set released in 1990.  Neutral Zone issued The Destroyer (NZCD 89013), containing “Going To California” to “Rock And Roll” and with “Stairway To Heaven” dropped, and Nobody’s Fault But Mine (NZCD 89015) containing the first hour of the show from “The Song Remains The Same” to “The Battle Of Evermore.” Destroyer (Archive) is a 1989 West German production in “perfect soundboard quality” but attributes this show to August 1977.  Coming Back To The Murder Stage (Buccaneer Records BUC 021/2) is a 2CD set erroneously attributing this show to April 28th, and also includes the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary reunion set.

Destroyer (BGS009-2) is a 2CD 1992 Italian release which claims to be re-mastered and replicates the artwork on the earlier Archive release.  Australia issued this tape at least three times beginning in 1993 with Led Zeppelin Live (Apple House Music SL-23 and SL-24), two CDs with the songs out of sequence.  The second disc of the Apple House production was copied on SW 39, and both were issued on the Banana label as Last Stand Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 on (BAN-025-A & B) Destroyer (Silverbird ZLNCD29) with correct date and a bonus track “Hey Joe” from Band Of Joy demo.

The early nineties also saw the release the first of four separate Tarantura releases on The Destroyer 1st Day (Tarantura T6CD-1).  This box set was issued in 1993 containing both the April 27th soundboard and the April 28th audience recordings.  The label issued the soundboard again two years later on The Destroyer Gold (Tarantura TUDCD-004~006).

Destroyer:  Final Edition (Cobra Standard 004) is a 3CD set issued in a cardboard sleeve with same lettering as first TSP vinyl.  The Pot label issued The Original Stereo Destroyer (POT-001/002) on two discs and Antrabata includes this on three discs in The Final Statements, a 9CD box set that also includes the September 4th, 1970 Los Angeles and July 28th, 1973 New York tapes.  The Destroyer (Last Stand Disc LSD-16/17/18) is a three disc set released in 1997 with excellent three disc set with 24-bit re-mastering in excellent quality.

Shout To The Top also released Destroyer (STTP 055/056/057) about this time.  Empress Valley released The Destroyer (EVSD-40/41/42) in 2000 in an LP sized case with the front cover replicating the old Smilin’ Ears vinyl edition of the audience recording from the following night.  This version is, by almost unanimous consensus, the best sounding and most complete version of the tape.  Several years later Tarantura issued two separate six-disc box sets simultaneously with both Cleveland shows.  The Destroyers (TCD-10-1~3) and The Destroyer (Flesh/Trade Mark Of Quality TMQ 20021 1-3) are two different remastering jobs and are singled out to be among the very worst titles released by Tarantura.

In 2004 Empress Valley released the tape again in The Supreme Destroyers (EVSD-276/277/278).  This is a 9CD box set released with two separate covers that contains also the audience recordings from the April 28tg Cleveland show and the May 30th Largo, Maryland show.  This show also appears on the DVDR-A title Destroyer (Genuine Masters GM-27.04.1977-DVD-A-18) which is superb.

Destroyer on the SODD label is the latest release and a rare non-Rolling Stones title.  The sound quality compares favorably with Empress Valley’s first release which is considered to be the best version of them all.  The familiar cuts are still present with the tape beginning at the first verse of “The Song Remains The Same.”  Also there are two faint digital faults on disc one that can be found at 4:22 in “Sick Again” and at 18:11 in “No Quarter.”

These sound like speed bumps, not very loud and don’t eliminate any music.  For the pickiest of collectors this is an issue, but for those who are more forgiving it won’t be.  With that said many do hope that the SODD people will fix these errors and make the correction available as Scorpio has done with their Ultimate Studio Sessions box set.  If that were to occur, then this release would be the definitive version of this often pressed show which is a solid concert despite some criticisms.  That this is a soundboard recording betrays many of the mistakes that are made on stage particularly by Page.  In the first hour of the show in particular he misses some cues and plays some bum notes.

What this concert really needs is a good audience recording to hear how the music was being received in the venue since the echo oftentimes covers them up.  Plant is in good voice and the rhythm section is solid as usual.  This night is right by the end of the first of three legs of their massive 1977 U.S. tour and would be followed by another night in Cleveland and the massive, record setting concert in Pontiac (whose clear audience recording was released only once by TDOLZ which runs way too slow).

SODD package this in a basic fatboy plastic jewel case.  The label usually issue bonus discs with their Rolling Stones titles, but there is no such bonus discs with this one.  Destroyer utilizes the font and graphic design first used by TSP in the eighties with a Madison Square Garden shot on the front cover.  The overall design is basic but effective and this version comes so very close to being definitive that we all hope the label will fix the errors.


The famed Destroyer tape begins during the first verse of The Song Remains the Same. Plant's voice starts off a bit rough and Page's fingers are constantly getting stuck in the strings. Things pick up during Sick Again. Plant seduces the crowd with his aggressive snarl as Page slashes and shreds through the bone-crushing rhythm. An unbelievably heavy performance, one of the best thus far. As the song ends, Plant tells the crowd "it's very nice to be back... in more ways than one." The band hammers through a devastating Nobody's Fault But Mine. Plant exclaims "go Jimmy, go!" as Page begins the guitar solo.

Since I've Been Loving You is excellent. As the song ends, Plant announces "Jimmy Page on guitar there... the doctor was played by Larry Badgely (the band's doctor) and management was arranged by Peter Grant." The ominous introduction to Jones's piano solo during No Quarter is fantastic. Unfortunately, a cut in the tape soon after leaves us at the end of the upbeat interlude. Page delivers an erratically epic guitar solo, punctuated by Bonzo's violent outbursts. Ten Years Gone features some fantastic soloing from Page. Before The Battle of Evermore, Plant tells the crowd "this song reflects, I s'pose more than anythin' else, an evening in England some seven hundred years ago... just about the time that me and Bonzo got married." Going to California is beautiful. As the song ends, Plant tells the crowd "this is startin' to feel good, man."

Plant introduces Bonzo as "one of the few gentlemen in Cleveland who manages to wash my hair with 7 Up, the man who... childhood friend, sweet baby, always been the lover boy of the band" before Over the Top. The drum solo features the extensive use of a spaced-out phasing effect as Bonzo hammers at his tympani. The song's finale is punctuated by a series of lightning-fast machine gun snare blasts. Page's fingers are a bit sticky during the first guitar solo in Achilles Last Stand. Plant dedicates Stairway to Heaven to "the sort of atmosphere that I think we've actually achieved between us all." Page disappears at the end of the guitar solo, leaving the rest of the band to fill the void for the remainder of the song.

As the band exits the stage, a cut in the tape leaves us near the end of the first verse of Rock and Roll. Page's guitar cuts out briefly at the beginning of the solo. Plant announces "well, now it's been a long time... I guess we should do a bit of stompin'" before the band closes the show with a heavy, plodding Trampled Underfoot. Bonzo gets into a disco rhythm for a few bars following the initial verses. Page shreds wildly through the guitar solo. A strong performance for the band's first night in Cleveland. Must hear.

The tape is an excellent soundboard recording.





Led Zeppelin
April 28, 1977
Richfield Coliseum
Cleveland, OH

Destroyer 40th Anniversary
EVSD 279-281



101. The Song Remains the Same
102. The Rover (introduction) / Sick Again
103. Nobody's Fault But Mine
104. In My Time of Dying
105. Since I've Been Loving You
106. No Quarter

201. Ten Years Gone
202. The Battle of Evermore
203. Going To California
204. Black Country Woman
205. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
206. White Summer
207. Black Mountain Side
208. Kashmir

301. Moby Dick
302. Guitar Solo
303. Achilles Last Stand
304. Stairway To Heaven
305. Rock and Roll
306. Trampled Underfoot



This is clearly a night to remember. This gets my vote for the best show of the whole 1977 tour! The playing and energy are wonderful and Robert is in very strong voice. This show has what are probably the best ever versions of Ten Years Gone and Since I've Been Loving You from 1977, as well as a spine-chilling Jimmy Page Solo, a monstrous Achilles Last Stand, a grand Kashmir, and amazing playing throughout, especially from Jimmy. No Quarter is a wonderful, long version with lots of classical references thrown in.


The band's second night in Cleveland begins with a brief soundcheck before The Song Remains the Same comes thundering out of the gate. Sick Again is incredibly heavy. The stadium quakes under the power of Bonzo and Jones's bone-crushing rhythm as Page tears through the guitar solos. As the song ends, the taper can be heard shouting "oh fuck!" and "my god, we're in trouble!" There is a loud piercing squeal as Plant begins speaking, followed by a cut which leaves us at the beginning of Nobody's Fault But Mine. Plant exclaims "oh Jimmy!" as Page begins a blistering guitar solo.

There is a slight cut in the tape following Plant's aggressive shouts of "oh Georgina!" during an excellent In My Time of Dying. He and Bonzo get into a bit of Surrender as the song ends. Since I've Been Loving You is an epic drama. Page is absolutely on fire as he leads the band on an intense emotional journey. Bonzo pummels the crowd with a devastating stampede of drums as the frenzy reaches its peak. A truly amazing performance, one of the best thus far. Plant introduces No Quarter as "No Quaalude." Jones's piano solo features another frantic rendition of Nut Rocker, followed by an excellent blues interlude. Page delivers a dramatic guitar solo. An outstanding performance. Unfortunately, the song is cut during the final verse.

Ten Years Gone is absolutely fantastic. Plant hints at Dancing Days and Bob Dylan's Blues before Black Country Woman, which features his best Elvis impression. The crowd erupts as White Summer/Black Mountain Side gives way to a powerful Kashmir. Plant's aggressive howls echo over the crowd and into infinity. The taper exclaims "this sucks!" twelve minutes into Over the Top. Bonzo hammers at his drums with incredible intensity during Achilles Last Stand. The very beginning of Stairway to Heaven is missing from the tape. The taper can be heard saying "oh fuck" directly into the microphone during the initial verses. Page's epic guitar solo is dynamic and emotional. Bonzo thrashes wildly at anything within reach as the drama reaches its peak. An amazing performance. Unfortunately, the latter half of the song suffers from a series of minor tape issues.

As the band returns to the stage, Plant announces "there's still life in the old dog yet." The taper can once again be heard exclaiming "oh fuck!" as a chest-thumping Rock and Roll comes to a close. The band closes the show with a plodding Trampled Underfoot. A somewhat sluggish finale to an outstanding performance. Must hear.

The tape is clear and well-balanced, if a bit distant and noisy in the high end at times. Unfortunately, the majority of Plant's between song banter is missing from the tape.



poster

Friday, January 13, 2017

Led Zeppelin - 2016 - The Hermetic Order Of The Golden Dawn (EVSD)

Led Zeppelin
2016
The Hermetic Order Of The Golden Dawn




Led Zeppelin
May 24, 1975
Earls Court Arena
London, England 



101. Band Announcements
102. Rock And Roll
103. Sick Again
104. Over The Hills And Far Away
105. In My Time Of Dying
106. The Song Remains The Same
107. The Rain Song
108. kashmir

201. No Quarter
202. Tangerine
203. Going To California
204. That's The Way
205. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp
206. Trampled Underfoot

301. Moby Dick
302. Dazed And Confused

401. Stairway To Heaven
402. Crowd Anticipation
403. Whole Lotta Love
404. Black Dog


This is a monster of a show. The best of the five Earl's Court gigs, this show has the band reaching a peak for 1975, one that is even better than Seattle and LA two months earlier. Nicky Horne simply introduced the band: "Welcome to Earl's Court. For the next three hours ... your mother wouldn't like it!" No Quarter must be the best version ever recorded, and Dazed And Confused is an incredible journey. Dennis Healey was again remembered during the introduction to the Dazed: "We gotta fly soon. Y'know how it goes with Dennis ... dear Dennis. Private enterprise ... no artists in the country anymore ... he must be dazed and confusd!" Stairway To Heaven contains probably the best solo ever by Jimmy on the song while Plant's vocal is not the best. The humour was belonged to the whole group so Bonham took the microphone as they climbed for the encores and said: "I'd like to say at this point that I think football's a load of bollocks!" what caued a quick retord from Plant: "I'd like to say that soccer's a wonderful sport, the best sport."

The tape begins with Nicky Horne announcing "for the next three hours, your mother wouldn't like it" as the band takes the stage. Things get off to a somewhat sluggish start, Bonzo sounds tired as he fumbles through the drum outburst at the end of Rock and Roll. Page's fingers get caught in the strings during the second guitar solo in Sick Again. As the song ends, Plant jokingly hints at Living Loving Maid during his usual "six and a half years" spiel. Page's fingers are like razor blades as he slashes and shreds through an erratic guitar solo during Over the Hills and Far Away.

In My Time of Dying is introduced as "a song that came from the deep south of America." The PA problems persist, causing Page's guitar to cut out briefly during the initial verses. Plant references Hey Joe, exclaiming "so I gave her the gun, and I shot her!" as Page launches into the first guitar solo. The band's timing gets a bit sloppy as the song progresses. Plant tells the crowd "it really is a treat to be playing in England again" before dedicating No Quarter to "anybody who's got any hope that everything can be okay in our wonderful country again." The instrumental section is transformed into a somewhat disjointed free-form improvisation featuring an excellent laid-back guitar solo from Page. Tangerine is introduced as "a song of love in its most innocent stages." That's the Way is beautiful. Page shreds wildly as Bonzo pummels the crowd during an erratic Trampled Underfoot.

Plant sings a few lines of Rip it Up before announcing "tonight, there's a lad watching his dad who is a remarkable drummer... he's a better drummer that eighty percent of rock group drummers today and he's eight years old, so... Jason Bonham, this is your dad!" prior to Moby Dick. The penultimate performance of Dazed and Confused is introduced as "a song that came at the very beginning of our time." Page solos wildly through the lead-in to the bow solo. The mournful Woodstock interlude is fantastic. Page erupts in a furious cascade of notes during the guitar solo/workout section, his fingers tear across the fretboard at lightning speed. The outro jam is extended beyond all limits. Stairway to Heaven is introduced as "a song which typifies the mood of hope, which in our brighter moments surrounds us." Page delivers a truly amazing guitar solo, building tension with each note as the epic drama unfolds. An unbelievable performance, one of the best thus far.

As the band returns to the stage, Bonzo announces "I'd like to say at this point that I think football is a load of bollocks!" to which Plant responds "I'd like to say that soccer is a wonderful sport, the best sport," adding "and that's got nothin' to do with Bonzo's sentiments." Whole Lotta Love features an excellent theremin freakout, which includes bits of Sex Machine and Turn on Your Love Light.


Led Zeppelin
May 25, 1975
Earls Court Arena
London, England 



101. Before The Show
102. Band Announcements
103. Rock And Roll
104. Sick Again
105. Over The Hills And Far Away
106. In My Time Of Dying
107. The Song Remains The Same
108. The Rain Song
109. Kashmir

201. No Quarter
202. Tangerine
203. Going To California
204. That's The Way
205. Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp
206. Trampled Underfoot

301. Moby Dick
302. Dazed And Confused

401. Stairway To Heaven
402. Crowd Anticipation
403. Whole Lotta Love
404. Black Dog
405. Crowd Anticipation
406. Heartbreaker
407. Communication Breakdown
408. After The Show


The final Earl's Court show, the final 1975 show, and the last ever performance of Dazed And Confused. The initial string of numbers are high powered and aggressive! No Quarter is a really great jam and the acoustic section is pretty good. Moby Dick and Dazed are rather boring however, which is sad and rather unfitting as it is the last ever performance of the latter. Stairway To Heaven was dedicated to Plant's daughter: "Carmen - this song's to a little girl who sits probably wondering what it all about ... so, where is the bridge? Well, Carmen, were's your chance to find out where the bridge is ... and if you know, please let me know after the show." The solo is wonderful and the encores contain a tortured Theremin solo from Jimmy before the extra songs are played for the last night's sake.

The band's fifth and final night at Earls Court begins with Alan 'Fluff' Freeman announcing "we are here tonight because you and I have great taste" before Rock and Roll crashes into motion. Page blazes through the second guitar solo in Sick Again. As the song ends, Plant announces "good evening and welcome to the last concert in England for a considerable time." Page shreds frantically through an excellent guitar solo during Over the Hills and Far Away. In My Time of Dying is introduced as "an old work chant." Page solos wildly as Bonzo and Jones pummel the crowd. An incredibly powerful performance, one of the best thus far.

Bonzo is on fire during The Song Remains the Same, thrashing at his drums with wild abandon as Page's fingers race across the fretboard. The Rain Song is absolutely fantastic, one of the best in recent memory. Jones's somber piano solo during No Quarter features hints of Concierto de Aranjuez. The instrumental section is an epic journey. The band receives a thunderous ovation as the piece comes to a close. The climax is reached during the blistering outro. An outstanding performance. Page plays a bit of Tea For One as Plant introduces Tangerine. Going to California is delicately beautiful. Jones's mandolin work is fantastic. Plant makes a few references to Monty Python and the Holy Grail, asking the crowd "what is a shrubbery amongst friends?" before an excellent That's the Way.

The band gets into a bit of Robert Johnson's If I Had Possession Over Judgement Day before Bron-Y-Aur Stomp. Plant gives the crowd a brief history of Johnson's life before introducing Trampled Underfoot. Page shreds erratically through an aggressive guitar solo. Bonzo is introduced as "our blood brother" before a particularly thunderous Moby Dick. Plant says a few kind words about Peter Grant before introducing Dazed and Confused as "the essence of the early Zeppelin." The San Francisco interlude is hauntingly mournful. Plant's ghostly howls echo through the arena. Page's fingers are like razor blades as he slashes and shreds through the frantic guitar solo/workout section. Plant can be heard exclaiming "amen!" off-mic during the call and response section. Page solos wildly during the outro jam. A somewhat uneven final performance of the band's signature song.

Plant dedicates Stairway to Heaven to his daughter Carmen, saying "this is a song to a little girl who sits there, probably wondering what it's all about." Page delivers an excellent guitar solo despite breaking a string near the end. Plant sings the final line in complete silence. As the band returns to the stage, Plant says "is this our swan song, I wonder?" Page hints at Ozone Baby following an excellent funky jam during Whole Lotta Love. Plant unleashes a series of blood-curdling screeches during the violent theramin freakout. Page's fingers get a bit sticky during the extended guitar solo in Black Dog. As the song ends, Plant announces "good citizens of Great Britain, it's been five glorious days... thank you very much for bein' a great audience, and if you see Denis Healey, tell him we've gone."

Plant exclaims "this is somethin' we never do!" as the band returns to the stage once again, joking "any requests?" Page blazes through the fast guitar solo during Heartbreaker. Plant pushes his voice to the limit during the final verse. The band closes the show with an explosive Communication Breakdown. Plant does his best Jamaican accent during a fantastic funky breakdown. As the band leaves the stage for the final time, he announces "thank you very much for showin' us that England is still alive and well." A fantastic finale to 1975. Must hear.