Friday, September 11, 2015

Black Sabbath - 1969-11-16 - Dumfries

Black Sabbath
November 16, 1969
Rugman's Youth Club
Dumfries, Scotland







01. Black Sabbath
02. Let Me Love You Baby
03. Song For Jim
04. The Warning   
05. Wicked World   
06. Behind the Wall of Sleep 
07. Early Morning School  
08. N.I.B.    
09. Blue Blooded Man  

Band:
Vocals: Ozzy Osbourne
Guitar & Flute: Tony Iommi
Bass: Geezer Butler
Drums: Bill Ward


Taper: Alex Wilson

Alex Wilson's Original Notes: The night of Sunday, 16th November 1969 at Rugman's Youth Club changed my life. I'd never heard a band play with such power or heavy riffs before, and it actually made me start my own band!
I'll start off by describing Rugman’s - it's like standing in a small section of railway tunnel. There were stages at both ends, possibly about 20 yards long with walls curving onto the ceiling. The stage Sabbath played on was about 2 foot high. There were no fancy stage lights, just one red bulb overhead and all the other room lights were out! There was about a crowd of 80 to 100 of an average age around 16 years, so there was no alcohol. It is worth noting that there was NO swearing from Ozzy, possibly because there were kids present and maybe his Dumfries girlfriend as well, a girl named Gillian McQueen.
The acoustics were quite good if there was a crowd in. The show was recorded at the far stage from where the Sabs played, using one Grundig dynamic mic (thus making the tape just monaural). There was no automatic level setting on the mike then, so there are fluctuations in the recording level, as well as the inevitable bits of tape dropout considering the age of the tape originally used. During the music solos, you can hear the crowd chatting and discussing the evening, due to the obvious fact that they were standing between the mike and the band.
The original tape was recorded on a Grundig reel to reel at 3 and 3/4 ips. I used to record every Amplified Heat show, so my equipment was there. Towards the end of the seventies, the tape began to fall apart. God knows when the original tape used was manufactured! But I did manage to transfer the recording to another reel to reel. Sabbath played 2 sets that night, but I was so gobsmacked that I didn't record the first set!
Sabbath's equipment set-up that night was as follows: Ozzy sang through a Vox 100 watt P.A. amplifier via 2 Vox columns with four 10" speakers in each of them! Geezer and Tony had a Laney stack each with two 4 x 12" speaker cabinets each, but amazingly their Laney amp heads were only 60 watts (one amp per stack)! Bill's kit consisted of 1 bass drum, one hanging tom, one floor tom, one snare, and a hi hat!!
The tape lasts approximately 62 minutes and the running order is as follows:
1. Black Sabbath: I managed to get the last minute and half of this song.
2. Let Me Love You Baby: This is a fast jazz-blues song that I'm sure Jeff Beck/Rod Stewart did on their first LP. It lasts just under 5 minutes, but sadly suffers from a bit of volume drop out for 20 seconds in the last minute of the song. Otherwise, it's brilliant. This was the end of their first set of the evening. Ozzy announces that they’ll have a half-hour break at this point in the show. [Editors note: This song is actually a Buddy Guy song that was later covered by many artists including the Jeff Beck Group and Stevie Ray Vaughan. The original tape loses volume towards the end of the song, but this has been fixed...]
3. "A Song For Jim" / Bill Ward's Drum Solo / "A Song For Jim" [reprise]: The second set starts off with a flute and drum solo section featuring Tony Iommi on flute! This segues into Bill Ward soloing with his tiny kit! This section lasts approx 11 minutes and has a jazzy flute part in the middle that sounds like something out of the Pink Panther! [Editor's note - Although Alex had originally listed this one as just a "Flute & Drum solo", it immediately occurred to me that Tony was actually playing the melody for "A Song For Jim"! Upon closer inspection, I realized that Geezer was playing as well, so this is actually a live version of the song so many collectors have been clawing for. While we've only heard a smidgen of the unreleased demo for this song on the BLACK SABBATH STORY - VOLUME 1 video, we get to hear quite a bit more here. This rarely heard song sandwiches a rather lengthy Bill Ward drum solo and a short flute interlude from Tony. The complete running time of this track is 11:01.]
4. The Warning: After a small break of 30 seconds the fourth track is "Warning", lasting 17 minutes and 45 seconds. There are slight bits of volume dips and tape dropout during this number, which is otherwise very good quality. [Editor's note - This rendition of "The Warning" contains a few extra sections that were likely cut from the studio version, making this a nice opportunity to hear what may have been extracted. You can tell the audience is getting rather restless by the 15 minute mark, so it was probably wise to edit this one for the album. There is a small cut towards the end of the song, but is probably missing only a minute or so.]
5. Wicked World: The next song is "Wicked World", lasting 5 minutes 30 seconds. This features a jazzy section between verses 1 and 2 that’s not on the single version. I don’t know if it's been on any other recordings or not. There's a severe jump in the volume during the instrumental section leading to the last verse. God knows what caused that! You can hear Bill counting in the ending...
6. Behind The Wall Of Sleep: Next up is "Behind The Wall Of Sleep" at just under 5 minutes. The last 70 seconds features a fast jazz blues section, which I don’t remember on the original release. [Editor's note – This includes the same jazzy section that can also be heard on Paris ’70, John Peel’s Sunday Show 4/26/70 and Koln 4/3/70. This leads me to believe that the band originally intended that section to be part of the song. The studio version ends just before they would ordinarily kick into the jazz vamp.]
7. "Early One Morning" [a.k.a.Early Morning School]: The seventh track is a fast blues/boogie, which I believe they called "Early Warning School". I don’t have the announcement on tape, but I seem to recall that was the title they said. But I'm going back 35 years here to remember this! It lasts just under 5 minutes. Very good. [Editor's note – Sorry for the previous confusion on the title. David Rostowsky pointed out that this is more than likely a cover of the Elmore James song "Early One Morning", with slightly butchered lyrics!]
8. N.I.B.: The eighth track is "NIB" at just over 5 minutes long. This is the one that changed my musical outlook and encouraged me to start my own band. [Editor's note - "N.I.B." has different lyrics!! The 'chorus' sections ("My love for you has got to be real") are the same, but the verses are completely different.]
9. Blue Blood Man: The last track and the encore for the night is called "Blue Blood Man". It’s a fast blues/boogie that showcases Tony doing his Alvin Lee impersonation (via Django Reinhardt!) This lasts over 6 minutes and is great!
I spoke to the band after the show when they were packing their gear into their old Transit. I asked Tony why he had left Jethro Tull after even being on Top Of The Pops. T.O.T.P. was the ultimate pinnacle in those days, for you knew you'd arrived if you got on it. He told me he'd "Rather play with my mates. Jethro Tull are weird!" I can also remember my flared trousers flapping in the wind from the volume of the show when I was standing in front of the stage! I met the band another 3 times in the very early 70's and they always remembered the times they played in Dumfries. I'm sure there are more Dumfries dates for your timeline, which I'll try and find out for you.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Jeff Beck - 2015 - Feed Beck (EVSD - Flac)

Jeff Beck
2015
Feed Beck

(Empress Valley Supreme Disc)





May 9, 1975
Masonic Temple Theatre
Detroit, MI
01. Constipated Duck 04:25
02. She's A Woman 05:54
03. Freeway Jam / Definitely Maybe 14:08
04. Superstition 03:27
05. Cause We've Ended As Lovers 08:23
06. Power 5:10
07. Got The Feeling 06:10
08. Diamond Dust 4:03
09. You Know What I Mean 03:02


May 10, 1975
Riverside Theatre
Milwaukee, WI
01. Constipated Duck 04:12
02. She's A Woman 06:27
03. Freeway Jam / Definitely Maybe 14:03
04. Superstition 03:59
05. Cause We've Ended As Lovers 08:14
06. AIR Blower 05:17
0G. ot The Feeling 04:31
08. Diamond Dust0 2:42
09. Power 05:54


May 11, 1975
Ambassador Theatre
St. Louis, MO

01. Tuning 00:13
02. Constipated Duck (Incomplete)  04:30
03. She's A Woman 06:13
04. Freeway Jam (Incomplete) / Definitely Maybe 14:57
05. Superstition (Incomplete) 02:39
06. Cause We've Ended As Lovers 07:52
07. Air Blower (Incomplete) 04:19
08. Power 05:17
09. Got The Feeling 05:51
10. Tuning 00:33
11. You Know What I Mean 03:33
12. Diamond Dust 03:22

Wilbur Bascomb - bass; Jeff Beck - guitar; Max Middleton - keyboards; Bernard Purdie - drums
After redefining electric guitar during his tenure in the Yardbirds, numerous outstanding permutations of the Jeff Beck Group and following a brief experiment with ex-Vanilla Fudge/Cactus alumni in Beck, Bogart & Appice, Jeff Beck disappeared from the public eye. When he returned in 1975 with his new album, Blow By Blow, it was immediately apparent that Beck was taking an entirely new approach. The album, produced by the legendary George Martin at his AIR Studios, was strictly an instrumental affair and was clearly heading in a jazz-fusion direction. The results were nothing short of spectacular, gaining Beck a new legion of fans, and Blow By Blow would sail up the charts, soon to become one of the best selling instrumental albums of all time.
When Beck took this exciting new material on the road, he assembled a stellar new quartet featuring the outstanding rhythm section of bassist Wilbur Bascomb and drummer Bernard Purdie. He wisely retained the services of keyboardist Max Middleton, the only mainstay from his previous groups. Middleton's jazzy keyboard parts complimented much of Beck's finest early 1970s work, and in this new band he inspired Beck to reach new levels of sophistication. Beck's explorations into this new genre of music were immediately distinctive and would in retrospect prove to be the commercial peak of a long and illustrious career. This recording, when Jeff Beck and the Mahavishnu Orchestra took to the road together, captures this new era perfectly. Much of the Blow By Blow album is here, when it was fresh and new. Even when Beck dips back into his catalogue, older songs are given an altogether new instrumental treatment, bringing out delightful nuances and making them entirely new experiences.
The May 9, 1975 show, recorded at Detroit's Masonic Temple Theatre, kicks off with the humorously titled, "Constipated Duck." Just prior, one can here Beck preparing to do battle with a choice expletive aimed at his guitar. This opener showcases a wide range of guitar sounds and techniques, with Beck vacillating between screaming psychosis and lyrical beauty, all in the space of four minutes. The set continues with his infectious instrumental take on The Beatles classic, "She's a Woman," featuring Beck playing his guitar through a talk-box, a gadget that he helped introduce to a legion of guitar players. (The way this effect works is the electric guitar signal is diverted from the amplifier speaker to a special hose-like conduit. The hose directs the sound into the guitarist's mouth. Guitarists move their mouth as if they are speaking to change the tone and nuance of the sound, which is then picked up by the microphone.) Next up is one of the standout tracks from the new album, "Freeway Jam," which would become a ubiquitous radio staple, which segues directly into a spine tingling version of one of his finest older compositions, "Definitely Maybe." This is a prime example of the incredible chemistry between Beck and Middleton. Featuring some of Beck's most delicate and gut-wrenchingly beautiful slide guitar playing, at times this sounds as if Beck is channeling Duane Allman himself.
Beck next delivers a two-song tribute to Stevie Wonder, beginning with "Superstition," where he again uses the talk-box to allow his guitar to take the lead vocal. A beautiful introspective take on "Cause We've Ended as Lovers" follows. Beginning with a lovely keyboard improvisation sequence from Middleton, Beck's interpretation of this ballad remains one of his most beautiful displays of emotionally charged guitar playing ever and is certainly a highlight of this performance. His guitar pleads, weeps, and wails, in addition to sighing sweetly, revealing Beck's astounding control of dynamics.
For the last three songs of the set, Beck pulls out all the stops. A sizzling take on Stanley Clarke's "Power" and his own "Diamond Dust," in addition to the old Rough And Ready album track, "Got The Feeling," here revamped in a new instrumental arrangement, all feature blazing guitar work and illuminate what has always made Beck so distinctive. While plenty of other guitarists can play fast, Beck can hold one note, bend it, sustain it, and add in harmonics and distortion like no other. For the encore, Beck delivers the funkified frenzy of "You Know What I Mean," the classic opening track from Blow By Blow. This is another prime example of Beck utilizing the entire guitar, often changing the tone and timbre several times within the course of a song.
The May 10, 1975 set, recorded at Milwaukee's Riverside Theater, kicks off with the humorously titled, "Constipated Duck." This is a great opener as it showcases a wide range of guitar sounds and techniques. Beck vacillates between screaming psychosis and lyrical beauty, all in the space of four minutes. The set continues with his infectious instrumental take on The Beatles classic, "She's A Woman," featuring Beck playing his guitar through a talk-box, a gadget that he helped introduce to a legion of guitar players. (The way this effect works is the electric guitar signal is diverted from the amplifier speaker to a special hose-like conduit. The hose directs the sound into the guitarist's mouth. Guitarists move their mouth as if they are speaking to change the tone and nuance of the sound, which is then picked up by the microphone.) Next up is one of the standout tracks from the new album, Freeway Jam, which would become a ubiquitous radio staple, which segues directly into a spine tingling version of one of his finest older compositions, "Definitely Maybe." This is a prime example of the incredible chemistry between Beck and Middleton and it features some of Beck's most delicate and gut-wrenchingly beautiful slide guitar playing.
At this point, Beck does a two-song tribute to Stevie Wonder, beginning with an all instrumental take on "Superstition," where he again uses the talk-box to allow his guitar to take the lead vocal. A beautiful introspective take on "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" follows. Beginning with a lovely keyboard intro sequence from Middleton, Beck's interpretation of this ballad remains one of his most beautiful displays of emotionally charged guitar playing ever and is certainly a highlight of this performance. His guitar pleads, weeps and wails, in addition to sighing sweetly, revealing Beck's astounding control of dynamics.
For the last three songs of the set proper, Beck pulls out all the stops. "AIR Blower" and "Diamond Dust," as well as "Got The Feeling," another older number revamped in a new instrumental arrangement, all feature blazing guitar work and illuminate what has always made Beck so distinctive. While plenty of other guitarists can play fast, Beck can hold one note, bend it, and sustain it, while adding harmonics and distortion like no other. He utilizes the entire guitar, often changing the tone and timbre many times within the course of a song, creating a stately sound that ultimately reflects his own unpredictable personality.
The encore provides a scorching conclusion to the night with a special guest joining Beck on stage. He announces that John McLaughlin is coming on board "to play some blues for ya." While the up-tempo jam on "Power" that ensues isn't quite the blues, it is a remarkable performance, with intricate unison playing from Beck and McLaughlin as well as guitar pyrotechnics galore. Hearing these two monsters of electric guitar playing together is a rare treat and brings this memorable performance to a close.
The last set, recorded on May 11,1975 at St. Louis' Ambassador Theater, was the final night of the first leg of the North American Blow By Blow Tour, when both Jeff Beck and John McLaughlin's Mahavishnu Orchestra toured the continent together, providing audiences with a remarkable double bill of cutting edge jazz/rock fusion. Although not without a few dropouts on the master cassette, this recording captures Beck and one of his most revered bands at a peak moment in time. Following this performance, Beck would return to England for two weeks before embarking on the second leg of the tour at the end of the month.
Following some brief tune-ups, this fiery set kicks off with the humorously titled "Constipated Duck." Despite a brief cut in the master, this is a great opener as it showcases a wide range of guitar sounds and techniques. Beck vacillates between screaming psychosis and lyrical beauty, all in the space of four minutes. The set then continues with his infectious instrumental take on The Beatles classic, "She's A Woman," featuring Beck playing his guitar through a talk-box, a gadget that he helped introduce to a legion of guitar players. (The way this effect works is the electric guitar signal is diverted from the amplifier speaker to a special hose-like conduit. The hose directs the sound into the guitarist's mouth. Guitarists move their mouth as if they are speaking to change the tone and nuance of the sound, which is then picked up by the microphone.) Next up is one of the standout tracks from the new album, "Freeway Jam," which would soon become a ubiquitous radio staple. This too has a brief cut in the master, but it's a wonderful performance regardless. Following a brief drum interlude from Bernard Purdie, the song segues directly into a spine tingling version of one of Beck's finest older compositions, "Definitely Maybe." This is a prime example of the incredible chemistry between Beck and Middleton and it features some of Beck's delicate and beautiful slide guitar.
At this point, Beck does a two-song tribute to Stevie Wonder, beginning with an all-instrumental take on "Superstition," where he again uses the talk-box to allow his guitar to take the lead vocal. A beautiful introspective take on "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" follows. Beginning with a lovely keyboard intro sequence from Middleton, Beck's interpretation of this ballad remains one of his most beautiful displays of emotionally charged guitar playing ever, and this version is certainly a highlight of the performance. His guitar pleads, weeps, wails, and sweetly sighs, revealing Beck's astounding control of dynamics.
For the last several songs of the set, Beck pulls out all the stops beginning with "AIR Blower." A sizzling take on Stanley Clarke's "Power" follows, before the group tackles the old Rough And Ready album track, "Got The Feeling," here revamped in a new instrumental arrangement. All of these numbers feature blazing guitar work and illuminate what has always made Beck so distinctive. While plenty of other guitarists can play fast, Beck can take one note, bend it, sustain it, and add harmonics and distortion like no other. To conclude the proceedings, Beck delivers the funkified frenzy of "You Know What I Mean," the classic opening track from Blow By Blow. This provides yet another prime example of Beck utilizing the entire guitar, often changing the tone and timbre several times within the course of a song. For the encore, the group eases into "Diamond Dust," which rapidly builds up momentum before bringing this performance to a close.
Throughout this performance, Beck's band creates a stately sounding fusion of rock, jazz, soul and blues, bringing Beck's music to a new level of sophistication, while retaining the volatile quality that has always infused his guitar playing. Incorporating a diverse range of musical styles, seasoned with tasteful unpredictability, this performance is a textbook example of what makes any musician truly distinctive. Much like iconic figures such as Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane or Miles Davis, it's not so much the choice of material played, but how immersed the musician is within the context of the music. Here, Beck is deeply submerged and this music ultimately reflects his own volatile and unpredictable personality.

Monday, September 07, 2015

David Gilmour - 2015-09-05 - Brighton

David Gilmour
September 5, 2015
Brighton Centre
Brighton







01. Intro
02. 5AM
03. Rattle That Lock
04. Faces Of Stone
05. Intro
06. Wish You Were Here
07. A Boat Lies Waiting
08. The Blue
09. Money
10. Us And Them
11. In Any Tongue
12. High Hopes
13. Outro
14. Intro
15. Astronomy Domine
16. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pts. 1-5
17. Introductions
18. Fat Old Sun
19. On An Island
20. Intro
21. The Girl In The Yellow Dress
22. Today
23. Sorrow
24. Run Like Hell
25. Crowd
26. Intro
27. Time->Breathe (Reprise)
28. Comfortably Numb
29. Outro

David Gilmour - guitar, vocals
Phil Manzanera – guitar
Guy Pratt – bass
Jon Carin – keyboards, guitar
Stevie DiStanislao – drums, percussion
Kevin McAlea – keyboards
Theo Travis – saxes, clarinet
Bryan Chambers - backing vocals
Louise Marshall – backing vocals


An EBR Recording