Monday, December 07, 2015

Led Zeppelin - 1969-12-06 - Paris

Led Zeppelin
1969-12-06
Piston 70
Ecole Centrale
Chatenay-Malabry




Les Rendez-vous de Paris
Empress Valley Supreme Disk

101. Good Times Bad Times
102. Communication Breakdown
103. I Can't Quit You
104. Heartbreaker
105. Dazed And Confused
106. White Summer - Black Mountain Side

201. You Shook Me
202. Moby Dick
203. How Many More Times

For the final live appearance of 1969, Led Zeppelin played a special one-off show in Paris for students of the engineering school Centrale on December 6, that was not announced to the press. The event also included The Pretty Things and French bands Variations and Triangle on the bill.

An eyewitness commented on the LedZeppelin.com website: “The funniest thing is that there were 2 categories of people in the place. The first category was made of all the officials, and student parents all wearing tuxedo, suits, long dresses and fancy clothes, the other part was a bunch of young hippies/beatnick dressed people. It was a surprising combination. I’m not sure the organisation was expecting this gap but it worked fine even if we could feel some tension here and there.”

The “recently discovered” tape comes from a good to very good audience source. The drums are unfortunately pushed to the back of the mix while the vocals, guitars and bass are equally up front. There is some distortion present but it remains a very listenable and exciting document to hear. This is one of those wild out of control early Zeppelin shows that makes collecting fun. They are adding more songs from LZII now and their development as a band over the past year is really starting to show.

The intro of “Good Times, Bad Times” is used as a lead in to “Communication Breakdown”. They are definitely fired up as evident in Robert Plant’s wails and Page’s searing solos prove. A smooth transition into “I Can’t Quit You” gets into some slow but heavy blues. Jimmy is playing with a high level of intensity tonight and gets a big ovation when Plant introduces him after his amazing solo. Plant is apologizing for the delay (something we hear on a lot of tapes) and introduces “Heartbreaker”. Jimmy’s solo in the middle section is very wild even throwing his guitar out of tune for the remainder of the track. He includes a bit of Bach’s “Bouree” in the solo.

John Paul Jones gets right into “Dazed And Confused” forcing Robert to introduce the song over the bass intro. A near train wreck is averted when Jimmy misses a cue going into the middle section catching everyone off guard but entices some brilliantly quick thinking. At just a little over a year old the track is already reaching epic lengths at twenty minutes tonight and is great to hear these early versions like this.

Robert introduces “Jimmy Page on guitar” and asks for a chair before “White Summer/Black Mountain Side”. Jimmy’s finger picking is immaculate and he plays a beautiful version.

Robert says “This is written by Willie Dixon and many people have performed it, this is a thing called “You Shook Me”. Led Zeppelin performs a strange version of the track tonight. John Paul Jones starts the track on bass and switches over to organ about four minutes in. It’s is unclear whether or not he may have been having some trouble with his rig but he is back on bass at the 8:30 mark so it is possible he just decided to switch to organ for the solo in the middle. An interesting version to say the least with Plant and Page adding great solos on harmonica and guitar respectively.

John Bonham displays his extraordinary drum chops in the recently added “Moby Dick”. John’s solo sounds a bit disjointed in a few spots so perhaps he was still working out his live arrangement but he has, however, already incorporated his hand solo into the fold. The recorder has an easier job picking up the drums without all the surrounding instruments and captures an exceptional version.

Shouts of disapproval interrupt Robert telling the audience ‘”We’re gonna conclude with a thing …” and he reassures them “this goes on for some time”. “How Many More Times” is the star of the show with a lot of loose improv between Robert and Jimmy. The song will stretch to over 20 minutes with a long medley including Steal Away, The Hunter, Whole Lotta Love, and Boogie Chillun’. “Whole Lotta Love” has Page attempting to emulate the slides and after the second chorus they get into a bit of “Good Times Bad Times” again and eventually into a few more blues classics with some great bottleneck from Jimmy. This is one of the more exciting versions of the song from this era. Robert says goodnight as the tape cuts out and we are left not knowing what or if the audience was treated to an encore.


Thursday, December 03, 2015

Led Zeppelin - 1975-02-12 - New York City (40th Anniversary Edition - EVSD)

Led Zeppelin
February 12, 1975
Madison Square Garden
New York City, NY




Flying Circus - 40th Anniversary Edition 9CD Box
Empress Valley Supreme Disc



Audience and Soundboard Matrix




01. Rock And Roll
02. Sick Again
03. Over The Hills And Far Away
04. In My Time Of Dying
05. The Song Remains The Same
06. The Rain Song
07. Kashmir

01. No Quarter
02. Trampled Under Foot
03. Moby Dick

01. Dazed And Confused
02. Stairway To Heaven
03. Whole Lotta Love
04. Black Dog
05. Heartbreaker


Stereo Audience Source




01. Rock And Roll
02. Sick Again
03. Over The Hills And Far Away
04. In My Time Of Dying
05. The Song Remains The Same
06. The Rain Song
07. Kashmir

01. No Quarter
02. Trampled Under Foot
03. Moby Dick

01. Dazed And Confused
02. Stairway To Heaven
03. Whole Lotta Love
04. Black Dog
05. Heartbreaker



Stereo Soundboard Source



01. Rock And Roll
02. Sick Again
03. Over The Hills And Far Away
04. In My Time Of Dying
05. The Song Remains The Same
06. The Rain Song
07. Kashmir

01. No Quarter
02. Trampled Under Foot
03. Moby Dick

01. Dazed And Confused
02. Stairway To Heaven
03. Whole Lotta Love
04. Black Dog
05. Heartbreaker


Thursday, November 19, 2015

Led Zeppelin - 1975-03-03 - Fort Worth (Soundboard)

Led Zeppelin
March 3rd, 1975
Tarrant County Convention Center
Fort Worth, TX





Soundboard recording
Empress Valley Supreme Disc "Rock Super Stars"

101 Rock And Roll
102 Sick Again
103 Over The Hills And Far Away
104 In My Time Of Dying
105 The Song Remains The Same
106 The Rain Song
107 Kashmir

201 No Quarter
202 Trampled Underfoot
203 Moby Dick

301 Dazed And COnfused
302 Stairway To Heaven
303 Whole Lotta Love
304 Black Dog

Full scan of artwork coming later

Friday, September 11, 2015

Black Sabbath - 1969-11-16 - Dumfries

Black Sabbath
November 16, 1969
Rugman's Youth Club
Dumfries, Scotland







01. Black Sabbath
02. Let Me Love You Baby
03. Song For Jim
04. The Warning   
05. Wicked World   
06. Behind the Wall of Sleep 
07. Early Morning School  
08. N.I.B.    
09. Blue Blooded Man  

Band:
Vocals: Ozzy Osbourne
Guitar & Flute: Tony Iommi
Bass: Geezer Butler
Drums: Bill Ward


Taper: Alex Wilson

Alex Wilson's Original Notes: The night of Sunday, 16th November 1969 at Rugman's Youth Club changed my life. I'd never heard a band play with such power or heavy riffs before, and it actually made me start my own band!
I'll start off by describing Rugman’s - it's like standing in a small section of railway tunnel. There were stages at both ends, possibly about 20 yards long with walls curving onto the ceiling. The stage Sabbath played on was about 2 foot high. There were no fancy stage lights, just one red bulb overhead and all the other room lights were out! There was about a crowd of 80 to 100 of an average age around 16 years, so there was no alcohol. It is worth noting that there was NO swearing from Ozzy, possibly because there were kids present and maybe his Dumfries girlfriend as well, a girl named Gillian McQueen.
The acoustics were quite good if there was a crowd in. The show was recorded at the far stage from where the Sabs played, using one Grundig dynamic mic (thus making the tape just monaural). There was no automatic level setting on the mike then, so there are fluctuations in the recording level, as well as the inevitable bits of tape dropout considering the age of the tape originally used. During the music solos, you can hear the crowd chatting and discussing the evening, due to the obvious fact that they were standing between the mike and the band.
The original tape was recorded on a Grundig reel to reel at 3 and 3/4 ips. I used to record every Amplified Heat show, so my equipment was there. Towards the end of the seventies, the tape began to fall apart. God knows when the original tape used was manufactured! But I did manage to transfer the recording to another reel to reel. Sabbath played 2 sets that night, but I was so gobsmacked that I didn't record the first set!
Sabbath's equipment set-up that night was as follows: Ozzy sang through a Vox 100 watt P.A. amplifier via 2 Vox columns with four 10" speakers in each of them! Geezer and Tony had a Laney stack each with two 4 x 12" speaker cabinets each, but amazingly their Laney amp heads were only 60 watts (one amp per stack)! Bill's kit consisted of 1 bass drum, one hanging tom, one floor tom, one snare, and a hi hat!!
The tape lasts approximately 62 minutes and the running order is as follows:
1. Black Sabbath: I managed to get the last minute and half of this song.
2. Let Me Love You Baby: This is a fast jazz-blues song that I'm sure Jeff Beck/Rod Stewart did on their first LP. It lasts just under 5 minutes, but sadly suffers from a bit of volume drop out for 20 seconds in the last minute of the song. Otherwise, it's brilliant. This was the end of their first set of the evening. Ozzy announces that they’ll have a half-hour break at this point in the show. [Editors note: This song is actually a Buddy Guy song that was later covered by many artists including the Jeff Beck Group and Stevie Ray Vaughan. The original tape loses volume towards the end of the song, but this has been fixed...]
3. "A Song For Jim" / Bill Ward's Drum Solo / "A Song For Jim" [reprise]: The second set starts off with a flute and drum solo section featuring Tony Iommi on flute! This segues into Bill Ward soloing with his tiny kit! This section lasts approx 11 minutes and has a jazzy flute part in the middle that sounds like something out of the Pink Panther! [Editor's note - Although Alex had originally listed this one as just a "Flute & Drum solo", it immediately occurred to me that Tony was actually playing the melody for "A Song For Jim"! Upon closer inspection, I realized that Geezer was playing as well, so this is actually a live version of the song so many collectors have been clawing for. While we've only heard a smidgen of the unreleased demo for this song on the BLACK SABBATH STORY - VOLUME 1 video, we get to hear quite a bit more here. This rarely heard song sandwiches a rather lengthy Bill Ward drum solo and a short flute interlude from Tony. The complete running time of this track is 11:01.]
4. The Warning: After a small break of 30 seconds the fourth track is "Warning", lasting 17 minutes and 45 seconds. There are slight bits of volume dips and tape dropout during this number, which is otherwise very good quality. [Editor's note - This rendition of "The Warning" contains a few extra sections that were likely cut from the studio version, making this a nice opportunity to hear what may have been extracted. You can tell the audience is getting rather restless by the 15 minute mark, so it was probably wise to edit this one for the album. There is a small cut towards the end of the song, but is probably missing only a minute or so.]
5. Wicked World: The next song is "Wicked World", lasting 5 minutes 30 seconds. This features a jazzy section between verses 1 and 2 that’s not on the single version. I don’t know if it's been on any other recordings or not. There's a severe jump in the volume during the instrumental section leading to the last verse. God knows what caused that! You can hear Bill counting in the ending...
6. Behind The Wall Of Sleep: Next up is "Behind The Wall Of Sleep" at just under 5 minutes. The last 70 seconds features a fast jazz blues section, which I don’t remember on the original release. [Editor's note – This includes the same jazzy section that can also be heard on Paris ’70, John Peel’s Sunday Show 4/26/70 and Koln 4/3/70. This leads me to believe that the band originally intended that section to be part of the song. The studio version ends just before they would ordinarily kick into the jazz vamp.]
7. "Early One Morning" [a.k.a.Early Morning School]: The seventh track is a fast blues/boogie, which I believe they called "Early Warning School". I don’t have the announcement on tape, but I seem to recall that was the title they said. But I'm going back 35 years here to remember this! It lasts just under 5 minutes. Very good. [Editor's note – Sorry for the previous confusion on the title. David Rostowsky pointed out that this is more than likely a cover of the Elmore James song "Early One Morning", with slightly butchered lyrics!]
8. N.I.B.: The eighth track is "NIB" at just over 5 minutes long. This is the one that changed my musical outlook and encouraged me to start my own band. [Editor's note - "N.I.B." has different lyrics!! The 'chorus' sections ("My love for you has got to be real") are the same, but the verses are completely different.]
9. Blue Blood Man: The last track and the encore for the night is called "Blue Blood Man". It’s a fast blues/boogie that showcases Tony doing his Alvin Lee impersonation (via Django Reinhardt!) This lasts over 6 minutes and is great!
I spoke to the band after the show when they were packing their gear into their old Transit. I asked Tony why he had left Jethro Tull after even being on Top Of The Pops. T.O.T.P. was the ultimate pinnacle in those days, for you knew you'd arrived if you got on it. He told me he'd "Rather play with my mates. Jethro Tull are weird!" I can also remember my flared trousers flapping in the wind from the volume of the show when I was standing in front of the stage! I met the band another 3 times in the very early 70's and they always remembered the times they played in Dumfries. I'm sure there are more Dumfries dates for your timeline, which I'll try and find out for you.

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Jeff Beck - 2015 - Feed Beck (EVSD - Flac)

Jeff Beck
2015
Feed Beck

(Empress Valley Supreme Disc)





May 9, 1975
Masonic Temple Theatre
Detroit, MI
01. Constipated Duck 04:25
02. She's A Woman 05:54
03. Freeway Jam / Definitely Maybe 14:08
04. Superstition 03:27
05. Cause We've Ended As Lovers 08:23
06. Power 5:10
07. Got The Feeling 06:10
08. Diamond Dust 4:03
09. You Know What I Mean 03:02


May 10, 1975
Riverside Theatre
Milwaukee, WI
01. Constipated Duck 04:12
02. She's A Woman 06:27
03. Freeway Jam / Definitely Maybe 14:03
04. Superstition 03:59
05. Cause We've Ended As Lovers 08:14
06. AIR Blower 05:17
0G. ot The Feeling 04:31
08. Diamond Dust0 2:42
09. Power 05:54


May 11, 1975
Ambassador Theatre
St. Louis, MO

01. Tuning 00:13
02. Constipated Duck (Incomplete)  04:30
03. She's A Woman 06:13
04. Freeway Jam (Incomplete) / Definitely Maybe 14:57
05. Superstition (Incomplete) 02:39
06. Cause We've Ended As Lovers 07:52
07. Air Blower (Incomplete) 04:19
08. Power 05:17
09. Got The Feeling 05:51
10. Tuning 00:33
11. You Know What I Mean 03:33
12. Diamond Dust 03:22

Wilbur Bascomb - bass; Jeff Beck - guitar; Max Middleton - keyboards; Bernard Purdie - drums
After redefining electric guitar during his tenure in the Yardbirds, numerous outstanding permutations of the Jeff Beck Group and following a brief experiment with ex-Vanilla Fudge/Cactus alumni in Beck, Bogart & Appice, Jeff Beck disappeared from the public eye. When he returned in 1975 with his new album, Blow By Blow, it was immediately apparent that Beck was taking an entirely new approach. The album, produced by the legendary George Martin at his AIR Studios, was strictly an instrumental affair and was clearly heading in a jazz-fusion direction. The results were nothing short of spectacular, gaining Beck a new legion of fans, and Blow By Blow would sail up the charts, soon to become one of the best selling instrumental albums of all time.
When Beck took this exciting new material on the road, he assembled a stellar new quartet featuring the outstanding rhythm section of bassist Wilbur Bascomb and drummer Bernard Purdie. He wisely retained the services of keyboardist Max Middleton, the only mainstay from his previous groups. Middleton's jazzy keyboard parts complimented much of Beck's finest early 1970s work, and in this new band he inspired Beck to reach new levels of sophistication. Beck's explorations into this new genre of music were immediately distinctive and would in retrospect prove to be the commercial peak of a long and illustrious career. This recording, when Jeff Beck and the Mahavishnu Orchestra took to the road together, captures this new era perfectly. Much of the Blow By Blow album is here, when it was fresh and new. Even when Beck dips back into his catalogue, older songs are given an altogether new instrumental treatment, bringing out delightful nuances and making them entirely new experiences.
The May 9, 1975 show, recorded at Detroit's Masonic Temple Theatre, kicks off with the humorously titled, "Constipated Duck." Just prior, one can here Beck preparing to do battle with a choice expletive aimed at his guitar. This opener showcases a wide range of guitar sounds and techniques, with Beck vacillating between screaming psychosis and lyrical beauty, all in the space of four minutes. The set continues with his infectious instrumental take on The Beatles classic, "She's a Woman," featuring Beck playing his guitar through a talk-box, a gadget that he helped introduce to a legion of guitar players. (The way this effect works is the electric guitar signal is diverted from the amplifier speaker to a special hose-like conduit. The hose directs the sound into the guitarist's mouth. Guitarists move their mouth as if they are speaking to change the tone and nuance of the sound, which is then picked up by the microphone.) Next up is one of the standout tracks from the new album, "Freeway Jam," which would become a ubiquitous radio staple, which segues directly into a spine tingling version of one of his finest older compositions, "Definitely Maybe." This is a prime example of the incredible chemistry between Beck and Middleton. Featuring some of Beck's most delicate and gut-wrenchingly beautiful slide guitar playing, at times this sounds as if Beck is channeling Duane Allman himself.
Beck next delivers a two-song tribute to Stevie Wonder, beginning with "Superstition," where he again uses the talk-box to allow his guitar to take the lead vocal. A beautiful introspective take on "Cause We've Ended as Lovers" follows. Beginning with a lovely keyboard improvisation sequence from Middleton, Beck's interpretation of this ballad remains one of his most beautiful displays of emotionally charged guitar playing ever and is certainly a highlight of this performance. His guitar pleads, weeps, and wails, in addition to sighing sweetly, revealing Beck's astounding control of dynamics.
For the last three songs of the set, Beck pulls out all the stops. A sizzling take on Stanley Clarke's "Power" and his own "Diamond Dust," in addition to the old Rough And Ready album track, "Got The Feeling," here revamped in a new instrumental arrangement, all feature blazing guitar work and illuminate what has always made Beck so distinctive. While plenty of other guitarists can play fast, Beck can hold one note, bend it, sustain it, and add in harmonics and distortion like no other. For the encore, Beck delivers the funkified frenzy of "You Know What I Mean," the classic opening track from Blow By Blow. This is another prime example of Beck utilizing the entire guitar, often changing the tone and timbre several times within the course of a song.
The May 10, 1975 set, recorded at Milwaukee's Riverside Theater, kicks off with the humorously titled, "Constipated Duck." This is a great opener as it showcases a wide range of guitar sounds and techniques. Beck vacillates between screaming psychosis and lyrical beauty, all in the space of four minutes. The set continues with his infectious instrumental take on The Beatles classic, "She's A Woman," featuring Beck playing his guitar through a talk-box, a gadget that he helped introduce to a legion of guitar players. (The way this effect works is the electric guitar signal is diverted from the amplifier speaker to a special hose-like conduit. The hose directs the sound into the guitarist's mouth. Guitarists move their mouth as if they are speaking to change the tone and nuance of the sound, which is then picked up by the microphone.) Next up is one of the standout tracks from the new album, Freeway Jam, which would become a ubiquitous radio staple, which segues directly into a spine tingling version of one of his finest older compositions, "Definitely Maybe." This is a prime example of the incredible chemistry between Beck and Middleton and it features some of Beck's most delicate and gut-wrenchingly beautiful slide guitar playing.
At this point, Beck does a two-song tribute to Stevie Wonder, beginning with an all instrumental take on "Superstition," where he again uses the talk-box to allow his guitar to take the lead vocal. A beautiful introspective take on "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" follows. Beginning with a lovely keyboard intro sequence from Middleton, Beck's interpretation of this ballad remains one of his most beautiful displays of emotionally charged guitar playing ever and is certainly a highlight of this performance. His guitar pleads, weeps and wails, in addition to sighing sweetly, revealing Beck's astounding control of dynamics.
For the last three songs of the set proper, Beck pulls out all the stops. "AIR Blower" and "Diamond Dust," as well as "Got The Feeling," another older number revamped in a new instrumental arrangement, all feature blazing guitar work and illuminate what has always made Beck so distinctive. While plenty of other guitarists can play fast, Beck can hold one note, bend it, and sustain it, while adding harmonics and distortion like no other. He utilizes the entire guitar, often changing the tone and timbre many times within the course of a song, creating a stately sound that ultimately reflects his own unpredictable personality.
The encore provides a scorching conclusion to the night with a special guest joining Beck on stage. He announces that John McLaughlin is coming on board "to play some blues for ya." While the up-tempo jam on "Power" that ensues isn't quite the blues, it is a remarkable performance, with intricate unison playing from Beck and McLaughlin as well as guitar pyrotechnics galore. Hearing these two monsters of electric guitar playing together is a rare treat and brings this memorable performance to a close.
The last set, recorded on May 11,1975 at St. Louis' Ambassador Theater, was the final night of the first leg of the North American Blow By Blow Tour, when both Jeff Beck and John McLaughlin's Mahavishnu Orchestra toured the continent together, providing audiences with a remarkable double bill of cutting edge jazz/rock fusion. Although not without a few dropouts on the master cassette, this recording captures Beck and one of his most revered bands at a peak moment in time. Following this performance, Beck would return to England for two weeks before embarking on the second leg of the tour at the end of the month.
Following some brief tune-ups, this fiery set kicks off with the humorously titled "Constipated Duck." Despite a brief cut in the master, this is a great opener as it showcases a wide range of guitar sounds and techniques. Beck vacillates between screaming psychosis and lyrical beauty, all in the space of four minutes. The set then continues with his infectious instrumental take on The Beatles classic, "She's A Woman," featuring Beck playing his guitar through a talk-box, a gadget that he helped introduce to a legion of guitar players. (The way this effect works is the electric guitar signal is diverted from the amplifier speaker to a special hose-like conduit. The hose directs the sound into the guitarist's mouth. Guitarists move their mouth as if they are speaking to change the tone and nuance of the sound, which is then picked up by the microphone.) Next up is one of the standout tracks from the new album, "Freeway Jam," which would soon become a ubiquitous radio staple. This too has a brief cut in the master, but it's a wonderful performance regardless. Following a brief drum interlude from Bernard Purdie, the song segues directly into a spine tingling version of one of Beck's finest older compositions, "Definitely Maybe." This is a prime example of the incredible chemistry between Beck and Middleton and it features some of Beck's delicate and beautiful slide guitar.
At this point, Beck does a two-song tribute to Stevie Wonder, beginning with an all-instrumental take on "Superstition," where he again uses the talk-box to allow his guitar to take the lead vocal. A beautiful introspective take on "Cause We've Ended As Lovers" follows. Beginning with a lovely keyboard intro sequence from Middleton, Beck's interpretation of this ballad remains one of his most beautiful displays of emotionally charged guitar playing ever, and this version is certainly a highlight of the performance. His guitar pleads, weeps, wails, and sweetly sighs, revealing Beck's astounding control of dynamics.
For the last several songs of the set, Beck pulls out all the stops beginning with "AIR Blower." A sizzling take on Stanley Clarke's "Power" follows, before the group tackles the old Rough And Ready album track, "Got The Feeling," here revamped in a new instrumental arrangement. All of these numbers feature blazing guitar work and illuminate what has always made Beck so distinctive. While plenty of other guitarists can play fast, Beck can take one note, bend it, sustain it, and add harmonics and distortion like no other. To conclude the proceedings, Beck delivers the funkified frenzy of "You Know What I Mean," the classic opening track from Blow By Blow. This provides yet another prime example of Beck utilizing the entire guitar, often changing the tone and timbre several times within the course of a song. For the encore, the group eases into "Diamond Dust," which rapidly builds up momentum before bringing this performance to a close.
Throughout this performance, Beck's band creates a stately sounding fusion of rock, jazz, soul and blues, bringing Beck's music to a new level of sophistication, while retaining the volatile quality that has always infused his guitar playing. Incorporating a diverse range of musical styles, seasoned with tasteful unpredictability, this performance is a textbook example of what makes any musician truly distinctive. Much like iconic figures such as Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane or Miles Davis, it's not so much the choice of material played, but how immersed the musician is within the context of the music. Here, Beck is deeply submerged and this music ultimately reflects his own volatile and unpredictable personality.

Monday, September 07, 2015

David Gilmour - 2015-09-05 - Brighton

David Gilmour
September 5, 2015
Brighton Centre
Brighton







01. Intro
02. 5AM
03. Rattle That Lock
04. Faces Of Stone
05. Intro
06. Wish You Were Here
07. A Boat Lies Waiting
08. The Blue
09. Money
10. Us And Them
11. In Any Tongue
12. High Hopes
13. Outro
14. Intro
15. Astronomy Domine
16. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pts. 1-5
17. Introductions
18. Fat Old Sun
19. On An Island
20. Intro
21. The Girl In The Yellow Dress
22. Today
23. Sorrow
24. Run Like Hell
25. Crowd
26. Intro
27. Time->Breathe (Reprise)
28. Comfortably Numb
29. Outro

David Gilmour - guitar, vocals
Phil Manzanera – guitar
Guy Pratt – bass
Jon Carin – keyboards, guitar
Stevie DiStanislao – drums, percussion
Kevin McAlea – keyboards
Theo Travis – saxes, clarinet
Bryan Chambers - backing vocals
Louise Marshall – backing vocals


An EBR Recording

Monday, August 24, 2015

Rainbow - 2015 - Return Of Satan (1st edition - EVSD)

Rainbow
2015
Return Of Satan

 
Knights Of Rainbow
1976-12-02
Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium

 

101. Opening
102. Over The Rainbow
103. Kill The King
104. Mistreated ~ Intro ~ Promoter's Announcement
105. Mistreated
106. Greensleeves
107. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves
108. BWV147
109. Catch The Rainbow
110. Band Introduction
111. Lazy ~ White Christmas
112. Man On The Silver Mountain
113. Blues
114. Starstruck ~ Man On The Silver Mountain
201. Tony Carey Keyboard Solo
202. Stargazer
203. Still I'm Sad 
204. Cozy Powell Drums Solo
205. 1812 Overture
206. Still I'm Sad
207. Do You Close Your Eyes
208. Over The Rainbow ~ Promoter's Announcement

Return Of Satan
1976-12-16
Tokyo Budokan Hall
(Afternoon Show

 

101: Opening
102: Over The Rainbow
103: Kill The King
104: Mistreated
105: Greensleeves
106: Sixteenth Century Greensleeves
107: BWV147
108: Catch The Rainbow
109: Band Introduction
110: Man On The Silver Mountain
111: Starstruck ~ Man On The Silver Mountain
201: Tony Carey Keyboard Solo
202: A Light In The Black
203: White Christmas
204: Still I'm Sad
205: Cozy Powell Drums Solo
206: 1812 OverTure
207: Still I'm Sad
208: Over The Rainbow ~ Promoter's Annoucement

Return Of Satan
1976-12-16
Tokyo Budokan Hall
(Evening Show)

101. Opening ~ Jingle Bell
102. Over The Rainbow
103. Kill The King
104. Mistreated
105. Greensleeves
106. Sixteenth Century Greensleeves
107. BWV147
108. Catch The Rainbow
109. Lazy ~ White Christmas
110. Man On The Silver Mountain
111. Starstruck ~ Man On The Silver Mountain
201. Tony Carey Keyboard Solo
202. Stargazer
203. Still I'm Sad
204. Cozy Powell Drums Solo
205. 1812 OverTure
206. Still I'm Sad
207. Do You Close Your Eyes
208. Over The Rainbow ~ Promoter's Annoucement




Chase The Rainbow
1976-12-16
Tokyo Budokan Hall
(Evening Show)

 

01. Over The Rainbow
02. Mistreated
03. Sixteen Century Greensleeves
04. Catch The Rainbow
05. Man On The Silver Mountain

Ritchie Blackmore: Guitar
Ronnie James Dio: Vocals
Jimmy Bain: Bass, Backing Vocals
Tony Carey: Keyboards
Cozy Powell: Drums

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Led Zeppelin - 2015 - Black Dragon With Blue Axe (EVSD)

Led Zeppelin
May 18, 1975
Earls Court Exhibition Centre
London, England




 

Black Dragon With Blue Axe
Empress Valley Supreme Disc




Remaster of "No Quarter"
Black Dragon With Blue Axe

01. Introduction by Johnnie Walker
02. Rock and Roll
03. Sick Again
04. Over The Hills and Far Away
05. In My Time Of Dying
06. The Song Remains The Same
07. The Rain Song
08. Kashmir
09. No Quarter
10. Tangerine
11. Going to California
12. That's The Way
13. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
14. Trampled Under Foot
15. Moby Dick
16. Dazed and Confused
17. Stairway to Heaven
18. Whole Lotta Love
19. Black Dog



New Source
Journey Into The Fourth Dimension

01. Introduction by Johnnie Walker
02. Rock and Roll
03. Sick Again
04. Over The Hills and Far Away
05. In My Time Of Dying
06. The Song Remains The Same
07. The Rain Song
08. Kashmir
09. No Quarter
10. Tangerine
11. Going to California
12. That's The Way
13. Bron-Y-Aur Stomp
14. Trampled Under Foot
15. Moby Dick
16. Dazed and Confused
17. Stairway to Heaven
18. Whole Lotta Love
19. Black Dog

Review: There are moments during Zeppelin’s colorful, sometimes psychedelic, non-stop 240-minute show in the eerie wastes of Earl’s Court (the Stones do 50 minutes or less), when Jimmy Page’s searing guitar, carried by 60,000 watts of power, cuts right through the senses like some fast-acting drug and virtually blots out everything but the music.
And with lead singer Robert Plant looking like some demented Shirley Temple – thick blond hair falling in ringlets across his shoulders, Miss Selfridge’s blouse slashed open to the navel, neck and arms adorned with jewelry and a Bardot pout to his lips – this in its field is one of the most astonishing examples of pure theatre I have ever seen anywhere.
Up  there on stage, flanked by 40 tons of equipment that is generating enough light to illuminate Piccadilly Circus, Leicester Square and London’s theatreland as well, Page in his black velvet suit embroidered with gold dragons allows a smile to flicker across a weary face. And 17,000 people burst into applause as he picks out the intro for Stairway to Heaven, one Zeppelin’s most popular numbers.
In contrast, the group’s keyboard player and bassist John Paul Jones is a shy, intense introvert who two years ago seriously considered giving up rock to apply for the job of chief organist at Winchester Cathedral.
He remains in the shadows laying down excellent sounds to form with John Bonham the rhythmic platform for Plant and Page’s exotic excesses.
“When Led Zeppelin are peaking, then kiss your skull goodbye!”… or so they say! (R. Gilchrist, May 20, 1975)

The second night produces a much more relaxed and tight performance. No Quarter has to be one of the best versions ever and the acoustic section is incredibly intimate and effective. Jimmy's soloing, especially in the greatly expanded Over The Hills And Far Away, is staggering. The encores sound banal after the very good version of Dazed And Confused and the dramatic Stairway To Heaven.
As the show begins, it's obvious that the band has loosened up. tearing ferociously through the opening numbers. Over the Hills and Far Away is introduced as "the ultimate dream." Page blazes through an excellent guitar solo as Bonzo and Jones hammer out a funky groove. In My Time of Dying is incredibly powerful. Bonzo is on fire during The Song Remains the Same. Page's guitar cuts out briefly during the second guitar solo. The Rain Song is absolutely beautiful. As the song ends, Plant introduces Jones as "the only man who wears onions on his shoulders that I've ever met in my life."
Kashmir features an incredible performance from Plant. No Quarter is outstanding. Jones's dramatic piano solo gives way to an epic instrumental section featuring a fantastic guitar solo from Page. The band receives a long ovation as the piece comes to a close. A truly amazing performance, one of the best thus far. Going to California is introduced as "a song about the permanent constant search for any man with a vivid imagination for a Guinnevere." Before Bron-Y-Aur Stomp, Plant tells the crowd "I'm gonna sack whichever road manager has burnt the lyrics to the next song." As the song ends, he exclaims "we are The Knights Who Say Ni!" Peter Grant is introduced as "the man who made it all possible" before Trampled Underfoot. Page delivers an aggressive guitar solo.
Plant introduces Bonzo as "a man with no taste, no manners, no friends... my very best friend, the man who always kicks me when I'm down, ladies and gentlemen, John Bonham!" before Moby Dick. The Woodstock interlude during Dazed and Confused is hauntingly beautiful. Plant's ethereal howls echo through the arena as the bow solo begins. Page's fingers get a bit sticky as he shreds through the frantic guitar solo/workout section. The return to the main riff is devastatingly heavy with Bonzo thrashing wildly at anything within reach. The hypnotic outro jam is a cacophonous explosion of energy. As the song ends, someone near the taper can be heard saying "is that the end?"
Stairway to Heaven is introduced as "a song that came to us in a moment of great peace and tranquility." Page blazes through an excellent guitar solo. Plant delivers the final line in absolute silence. The band plods their way through the show-closing Black Dog. As they leave the stage, Plant announces "we'd like to that the road crew, Showco... and Denis Healey for being such a perv, goodnight."

Sunday, August 09, 2015

Yes - 2015-08-07 - Mashantucket

Yes
2015-08-07
Grand Theater
Mashantucket, CT






 

01. Onward (Video Tribute To Chris Squire)
02. Firebird Suite
03. Don't Kill The Whale
04. Tempus Fugit
05. America
06. Going For The One
07. Time And A Word
08. Clap
09. I've Seen All Good People
10. Siberian Khatru
11. Owner Of A Lonely Heart
12. Roundabout
13. Starship Trooper
 
Steve Howe - guitar, vocals
Alan White - drums
Geoff Downes - keyboards, vocals
Jon Davison - vocals, acoustic guitar, percussion
Billy Sherwood - bass, vocals
 
 
First show after the passing of Chris Squire

Thursday, August 06, 2015

Pink Floyd - 1971-11-06 - Cleveland

Pink Floyd
November 6, 1971
Emerson Gym
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, OH






101. The Embryo
102. Fat Old Sun
103. Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun
104. Atom Heart Mother

201. One Of These Days
202. Careful With That Axe Eugene
203. Cymbaline
204. Echoes
205. Blues

Eat A Peach! – EAT 24/25

David Gilmour
Richard Wright
Nick Mason
Roger Waters




Deep Purple - 2015-07-30 - Ledyard

Deep Purple
July 30, 2015
Grand Theater
Foxwoods Casino
Ledyard, CT



 
01 Intro music
02 Highway Star
03 Apre Vous
04 Hard Lovin' Man
05 Strange Kind of Woman
06 Vincent Price
07 Contact Lost
08 Uncommon Man
09 Well Dressed Guitar
10 The Mule
11 Lazy
12 Hell to Pay
13 Keyboard Solo
14 Perfect Strangers
15 Space Truckin'
16 Smoke on the Water
17 Green Onions
18 Hush w/Bass Solo
19 Black Night

Ian Gillan - Vocals
Steve Morse - Guitars
Roger Glover - Bass
Ian Paice - Drums
Don Airey - Keyboards

Deep Purple - 2015-07-24 - Lynn

Deep Purple
July 24, 2015
Memorial Auditorium
Lynn, MA






01 Intro music
02 Highway Star
03 Apre Vous
04 Hard Lovin' Man
05 Strange Kind of Woman
06 Vincent Price
07 Contact Lost
08 Uncommon Man
09 Well Dressed Guitar
10 The Mule>drum solo
11 Keyboard Solo
12 Lazy
13 Hell to Pay
14 Perfect Strangers
15 Space Truckin'
16 Smoke on the Water
17 I'm Going Down >
18 Hush w/Bass Solo
19 Black Night
Taped by: Farve4
Band:
Ian Gillan - Vocals
Steve Morse - Guitars
Roger Glover - Bass
Ian Paice - Drums
Don Airey - Keyboards

Tuesday, August 04, 2015

Led Zeppelin - Past, Present and Future

Led Zeppelin
2013
Past, Present and Future
 
 
 
Led Zeppelin
August 4, 1979
Knebworth Festival
Stevenage, UK
 
 
01. The Song Remains the Same
02. Celebration Day
03. Black Dog
04. Nobody's Fault But Mine
05. Over the Hills and Far Away
06. Misty Mountain Hop
07. Since I've Been Loving You
08. No Quarter
09. Ten Years Gone
10. Hot Dog
11. The Rain Song
12. White Summer / Black Mountainside
13. Kashmir
14. Trampled Underfoot
15. Sick Again
16. Achilles Last Stand
17. Guitar Solo
18. In the Evening
19. Stairway to Heaven
20. Rock and Roll
21. Whole Lotta Love
22. Heartbreaker
 
 

Led Zeppelin
August 11, 1979
Knebworth Festival
Stevenage, UK
 
 
1. The Song Remains the Same
02. Celebration Day
03. Black Dog
04. Nobody's Fault But Mine
05. Over the Hills and Far Away
06. Misty Mountain Hop
07. Since I've Been Loving You
08. No Quarter
09. Hot Dog
10. The Rain Song
11. White Summer / Black Mountainside
12. Kashmir
13. Trampled Underfoot
14. Sick Again
15. Achilles Last Stand
16. Guitar Solo
17. In the Evening
18. Stairway to Heaven
19. Rock and Roll
20. Whole Lotta Love
21. Communication Breakdown
 
 
 
 
A pretty good show but nothing compared to the standards Zeppelin had set in the past. The first 45 minutes or so sound good and strong, and Ten Years Gone is very pretty, but towards the middle section, the individual performances, though good, don't quite gel into a good ensemble performance. "Well, it's nice to see you again" said Plant to the audience at the beginning of the show, in fact they not played in the United Kingdom for the last four years! The crowd roared. Achilles Last Stand is aggressive and In The Evening is intense, but Stairway To Heaven sounds timid and tired ... Robert's introduction is so lackluster it is obvious he didn't want to play it. The encores are energetic and good, and Whole Lotta Love features the new arrangement first tried in Copenhagen in July. A short Heartbreaker finishes the event. After the last note, Plant said: "All you people that have come so far. It's been kinda like a blind date. Thanks for eleven years!"
 
 

 
 
 
Following a four year absence, Led Zeppelin make their triumphant return to England with two of the biggest shows of their career. However, despite two successful warm-up gigs in Denmark two weeks earlier, the band is still nervous to be performing for their home crowd after such a long break. The apprehension is evident as The Song Remains the Same gets underway. Page has lost the fluency of his Denmark performances, causing him to stumble a bit during the sticky-fingered guitar solos and Plant's voice is a little rusty at times. On the other hand, Bonzo is a thunderous explosion of energy, his powerful hammering is the backbone of the band. Following a high-speed Celebration Day, Plant greets the massive crowd, joking "I told Pagey that one or two people would be here, but he said he doubted it very much." Page's fingers get stuck in the strings during the guitar solo in Black Dog. Plant unleashes some spine-chilling shrieks during the initial verses. The band hammers through an abrasive Misty Mountain Hop.
Since I've Been Loving You is absolutely fantastic. Page leads the band on an intense emotional journey, tearing each note of the guitar solo from the depths of his soul. A phenomenal performance, one of the best in recent memory. Jones is introduced as "the man from Casablanca" before No Quarter. Page is on fire as he blazes through an excellent guitar solo, shredding furiously during the blistering outro jam. An outstanding performance. Plant shouts "come on, let's hoedown!" at the beginning of Hot Dog. The Rain Song is beautiful. The crowd erupts as a powerful Kashmir launches into motion. Plant's howls echo over the field and into infinity as the band thunders through the intimidating march. Page shreds wildly through the guitar solo during an incredibly aggressive Trampled Underfoot. The band hammers through a brutal Sick Again, introduced as a song that "relates the experience of the lobby and going down to get some cigarettes at ten thirty, rather than bein' in bed." Page tears through a frenzied guitar solo near the end of the song. Afterward, Plant jokes "so we got the cigarettes and carried straight on up to bed."
Bonzo thrashes wildly at his drums during an explosive Achilles Last Stand. Plant dedicates Stairway to Heaven to the crowd, thanking them for coming "on a blind date." Page blazes through a blistering guitar solo. The crowd sings the final line along with Plant. The first encore is preceded by ten solid minutes of cheering. As the band returns to the stage following a riotous Rock and Roll, Plant leads the crowd in a sing-along of You'll Never Walk Alone. The new arrangement of Whole Lotta Love is devastatingly heavy. As the song ends, Plant announces "thanks for eleven years." The band returns to the stage one more time to close the show with the first appearance of Heartbreaker since 6/21/1977. Page shreds wildly though the guitar solos. The crowd is left begging for more as the band leaves the stage for the final time.
 
 
 

 
 Not as good as the first week and also a little more tension in the air. Some songs sound very sloppy, almost like the band doesn't want to be there, but then again, some sound excellent. The opening 45 minutes or so sound strong and good, but the intensity starts to flag towards the end. Jimmy butchers the solo in Whole Lotta Love, and the end encores sound tired ("Can you do the dinosaur rock?" reflected what the band thought playing these old tunes). This was also the last concert in the United Kingdom but Robert, before as he left the stage, said: "We'll see you soon. Very soon. Don't know about the Marquee, but somewhere soon." They couldn't knew what happened a year later. Some problems with Page's guitar and PA system truncated Over The Hills And Far Away and Misty Mountain Hop.
 
 
 
 
A week after night one of the 1979 Knebworth Festival, the band returns for what will prove to be their final performance in England. The nerves of the first show have subsided and the band launches into The Song Remains the Same with power and gusto. Plant pushes his voice to the limit during a frantic Celebration Day. The massive crowd sings along with every word during a bone-crushing Black Dog. Plant has some trouble with his microphone during the initial verses of Over the Hills and Far Away, which causes a series of loud popping noises. Page's fingers get caught in the strings of his guitar during the song's outro.
 

Since I've Been Loving You is simply outstanding. Page blazes through a fantastic guitar solo with incredible fluency and precision. An unbelievably powerful performance, one of the best in recent memory. Jones briefly hints at Your Time is Gonna Come near the end of an excellent piano solo during the band's final performance of No Quarter. Page tears through an amazing guitar solo, shredding wildly during the song's explosive outro. In mentioning the new album, Plant tells the crowd "it's called In Through the Out Door, which is... one of those methods of entry that proves to be harder than one would originally expect." Hot Dog is dedicated to "the texas road crew and all the people to be found in the sleazy hangouts around there." Someone in the crowd can be heard shouting "New York City!" as Page begins The Rain Song. Bonzo pummels the crowd with his thunderous fills near the end of Kashmir. Page stumbles through a sticky-fingered guitar solo during Trampled Underfoot.
 

Achilles Last Stand is a bit dull and uninspired, despite Bonzo's efforts to inject some energy into the performance. Page gets lost near the end of the song. Plant delivers an incredibly powerful performance during In the Evening. As the song ends, someone in the crowd can be heard shouting "happy birthday Robert Plant!", to which Plant responds "not yet, one week." The crowd erupts as Rock and Roll crashes into motion. Page flubs the guitar solo during Whole Lotta Love. The biggest surprise of the night is the inclusion of the Boogie Chillen' section for the first time since 7/29/1973. Page blazes through an outstanding guitar solo. Plant shreds his voice as the band hammers through a blistering Communication Breakdown. An explosive finale to a somewhat uneven performance. As the band leaves the stage for the last time, Plant announces "thank you very much indeed... we'll see ya soon, very soon."
 
 

Thursday, July 30, 2015

Jimi Hendrix - 1969-02-18 - London (SBD)

Jimi Hendrix
1969-02-18
Royal Albert Hall
London
(EAT 34-35)






101. Introduction
102. Tax Free
103. Fire
104. Hear My Train A Comin'
105. Foxy Lady
106. Red House
201. Sunshine Of Your Love
202. Spanish Castle Magic / Message To Love
203. Star Spangled Banner
204. Purple Haze
205. Final Speak
206. Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)

Jimi Hendrix – lead vocals, guitar
Mitch Mitchell – drums
Noel Redding – bass guitar, backing vocals

On February 18, 1969, the Jimi Hendrix Experience played the first of two shows at London’s Royal Albert Hall. The band had played the venue previously, on November 14, 1967, on a bill with Pink Floyd, the Nice, the Move and other sonically adventurous bands of the time. This time, however, the Experience would be the headliner, playing first on the 18th and again on the 24th to a sold-out house.
Jimi’s great talent had grown in the 15 months since the 1967 show. Regular touring had honed his free-form playing, while his extensive studio work had seen him develop into a brilliant composer and visionary producer. Unfortunately, escalating tensions between Hendrix and his band—bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell—had begun to take a toll on the group’s performances. A European tour from January 8 to 23 had been a mess. The band performed lethargically, and Hendrix was uneasy with the audiences’ requests for them to play their recent hit, “All Along the Watchtower.”
He was also unhappy that his manager, Mike Jeffrey, had sent a film crew along to record the event for a television special. Jeffrey had never asked for Jimi’s creative input on the project, and Hendrix was concerned about production matters. He was especially adamant that he be allowed to choose his own engineer for the upcoming Royal Albert Hall performance, going so far as to send a memo to his manager on the subject.
In fact, Jeffrey did have an ulterior motive. Beyond the television special, he was hoping the Europe shows would provide enough recorded material for a live album, which he hoped to release that June. Once the live album was out of the way, Jeffrey planned to get another studio album out of the Experience in time for the lucrative Christmas season.
The live album was paramount to Jeffrey’s plans, but the uneven performances on the European tour had made him concerned that he would have nothing satisfactory to release. Originally, the Royal Albert Hall performance was a one-night stand, on February 18. As a safeguard, Jeffrey booked the band for the second performance, on February 24.
Following the European tour, Jimi flew to New York City to oversee the construction of his studio, Electric Lady. While the trip gave him a reprieve from his problems with the Experience, the time away only served to exacerbate the tensions between them. There were further problems awaiting him when he returned to London. On February 17, while rehearsing at the Albert Hall, Hendrix became aggravated by the constant feedback created between his guitar and the PA system. The mobile recording unit hired for the event was also experiencing electronic interference that would make the recordings unusable.
Hendrix placed a call to Chas Chandler, his former manager, and asked him to come for assistance. “It was a shambles,” Chandler told John McDermott in his book, Hendrix: Setting the Record Straight. “I ended up running both shows for him, trying to get everything right. I hadn’t been ‘hired,’ I was there to help out a friend.”
Although the recording equipment problems with were worked out, no one could guarantee that Jimi’s guitar wouldn’t suffer from feedback. To minimize the possibility, two separate sound systems were used: one for the venue and another for the mobile recording unit. This is why Jimi can be seen singing into three microphones in footage from the concerts.
Despite the preparations, the February 18 show was a disaster. Jimi played brilliantly, but Redding and Mitchell were lifeless. Chandler was irate with them. “It truly was one of the worst shows I had ever seen,” he told McDermott. “Up until that point I had been a supportive of the group, because I thought that they made for a good unit. Now I felt it was time they got thrown out.”
Under the circumstances, the show gave Jeffrey little that he could use for a live album. Rehearsals were scheduled for the days before the February 24 show to try to salvage what little opportunity remained. As it turned out, the second show was much better. Although the band lacked the fire and energy they’d displayed at earlier shows like 1967's Monterey Pop Festival, they played brilliantly. Hendrix threw out his usual set list and instead performed three of his own blues songs: “Hear My Train a Comin’,” “Red House” and “Bleeding Heart.” The group turned in solid versions of “Little Wing,” Voodoo Chile” and “Foxey Lady,” as well.
And while Hendrix didn’t believe in giving encores, he gave one to the Albert Hall crowd, bringing out Traffic’s Dave Mason and Chris Wood and percussionist Rocki Dzidzornu to perform a stirring version of “Room Full of Mirrors.”

Oddly, for all the fireworks happening onstage, the audience was exceptionally polite. They remained seated and quiet, clapping politely, as if at the symphony. Perhaps it was down to the house lights: the film crew had asked to have them left on to provide enough light for the film stock. Under the circumstances, the audience might have felt more self-conscious than usual.

Not surprisingly, the shows were the last European performances by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. On March 30, the band began a lengthy U.S. tour that would see Hendrix make his celebrated stand at Woodstock, on August 18, with a new band, Gypsy, Sun and Rainbows. The Experience had already imploded two months before, on June 29 at the Denver Pop Festival.

Performing that night in Denver, Jimi didn’t hold back the news. “This is the last gig we’ll be playing together,” he said. The original Jimi Hendrix Experience was finished.

On February 18, 1969, the Jimi Hendrix Experience played the first of two shows at London’s Royal Albert Hall. The band had played the venue previously, on November 14, 1967, on a bill with Pink Floyd, the Nice, the Move and other sonically adventurous bands of the time. This time, however, the Experience would be the headliner, playing first on the 18th and again on the 24th to a sold-out house.
Jimi’s great talent had grown in the 15 months since the 1967 show. Regular touring had honed his free-form playing, while his extensive studio work had seen him develop into a brilliant composer and visionary producer. Unfortunately, escalating tensions between Hendrix and his band—bassist Noel Redding and drummer Mitch Mitchell—had begun to take a toll on the group’s performances. A European tour from January 8 to 23 had been a mess. The band performed lethargically, and Hendrix was uneasy with the audiences’ requests for them to play their recent hit, “All Along the Watchtower.”
He was also unhappy that his manager, Mike Jeffrey, had sent a film crew along to record the event for a television special. Jeffrey had never asked for Jimi’s creative input on the project, and Hendrix was concerned about production matters. He was especially adamant that he be allowed to choose his own engineer for the upcoming Royal Albert Hall performance, going so far as to send a memo to his manager on the subject.
In fact, Jeffrey did have an ulterior motive. Beyond the television special, he was hoping the Europe shows would provide enough recorded material for a live album, which he hoped to release that June. Once the live album was out of the way, Jeffrey planned to get another studio album out of the Experience in time for the lucrative Christmas season.
The live album was paramount to Jeffrey’s plans, but the uneven performances on the European tour had made him concerned that he would have nothing satisfactory to release. Originally, the Royal Albert Hall performance was a one-night stand, on February 18. As a safeguard, Jeffrey booked the band for the second performance, on February 24.
Following the European tour, Jimi flew to New York City to oversee the construction of his studio, Electric Lady. While the trip gave him a reprieve from his problems with the Experience, the time away only served to exacerbate the tensions between them. There were further problems awaiting him when he returned to London. On February 17, while rehearsing at the Albert Hall, Hendrix became aggravated by the constant feedback created between his guitar and the PA system. The mobile recording unit hired for the event was also experiencing electronic interference that would make the recordings unusable.
Hendrix placed a call to Chas Chandler, his former manager, and asked him to come for assistance. “It was a shambles,” Chandler told John McDermott in his book, Hendrix: Setting the Record Straight. “I ended up running both shows for him, trying to get everything right. I hadn’t been ‘hired,’ I was there to help out a friend.”
Although the recording equipment problems with were worked out, no one could guarantee that Jimi’s guitar wouldn’t suffer from feedback. To minimize the possibility, two separate sound systems were used: one for the venue and another for the mobile recording unit. This is why Jimi can be seen singing into three microphones in footage from the concerts.
Despite the preparations, the February 18 show was a disaster. Jimi played brilliantly, but Redding and Mitchell were lifeless. Chandler was irate with them. “It truly was one of the worst shows I had ever seen,” he told McDermott. “Up until that point I had been a supportive of the group, because I thought that they made for a good unit. Now I felt it was time they got thrown out.”
Under the circumstances, the show gave Jeffrey little that he could use for a live album. Rehearsals were scheduled for the days before the February 24 show to try to salvage what little opportunity remained. As it turned out, the second show was much better. Although the band lacked the fire and energy they’d displayed at earlier shows like 1967's Monterey Pop Festival, they played brilliantly. Hendrix threw out his usual set list and instead performed three of his own blues songs: “Hear My Train a Comin’,” “Red House” and “Bleeding Heart.” The group turned in solid versions of “Little Wing,” Voodoo Chile” and “Foxey Lady,” as well.
And while Hendrix didn’t believe in giving encores, he gave one to the Albert Hall crowd, bringing out Traffic’s Dave Mason and Chris Wood and percussionist Rocki Dzidzornu to perform a stirring version of “Room Full of Mirrors.”

Oddly, for all the fireworks happening onstage, the audience was exceptionally polite. They remained seated and quiet, clapping politely, as if at the symphony. Perhaps it was down to the house lights: the film crew had asked to have them left on to provide enough light for the film stock. Under the circumstances, the audience might have felt more self-conscious than usual.

Not surprisingly, the shows were the last European performances by the Jimi Hendrix Experience. On March 30, the band began a lengthy U.S. tour that would see Hendrix make his celebrated stand at Woodstock, on August 18, with a new band, Gypsy, Sun and Rainbows. The Experience had already imploded two months before, on June 29 at the Denver Pop Festival.

Performing that night in Denver, Jimi didn’t hold back the news. “This is the last gig we’ll be playing together,” he said. The original Jimi Hendrix Experience was finished.

Friday, July 24, 2015

Deep Purple - 2015-07-14 - Lewiston, NY

Deep Purple
2015-07-14
Artpark Amphitheater
Lewiston, NY







01. Highway Star
02. Apre Vous
03. Hard Lovin' Man
04. Strange Kind of Woman
05. Vincent Price
06. Contact Lost + Uncommon Man + Well Dressed Guitar
07. The Mule
08. Lazy
09. Hell to Pay
10. Keyboard Solo + Perfect Strangers
11. Space Truckin'
12. Smoke on the Water
13. (Encore Break)
14. Hush + Black Night


Ian Paice-drums
Roger Glover-bass
Ian Gillan-Vocals
Steve Morse-guitars
Don Airey-keyboards

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Rush - 2015-05-08 - Tulsa

Rush
May 8, 2015
BOK Center
Tulsa, OK





Set 1
01 Intro montage  2:23
02 Clockwork Angels  7:19
03 The Anarchist   7:03
04 Headlong Flight  8:50
05 Far Cry  5:33
06 The Main Monkey Business  6:26
07 One Little Victory  5:53
08 Animate  6:23
09 Roll The Bones  6:01
10 Distant Early Warning  5:11
11 Subdivisions  5:53
Set 2
12 Intro film  6:08
13 Tom Sawyer  5:01
14 Red Barchetta  7:03
15 The Spirit of Radio  5:30
16 Jacob's Ladder  7:28
17 Hemispheres Prelude  4:25
18 Cygnus X-1  8:39
19 Closer To The Heart  2:58
20 Xanadu  10:41
21 2112  12:22
Encore:
22 Intro clip  1:37
23 Lakeside Park  2:25
24 Anthem  3:07
25 What You're Doing  3:43
26 Working Man w/ Garden Road teaser  5:28
27 Ending film  2:28
28 Outro music  2:14

Two source Matrix

Taper 1:   Tapehead2
Location: Section 120, row 3 (Alex stage side)
Lineage:  Schoeps MK4 > actives > tinybox > Sony M-10 >
                 WAV > Sound Studio > xACT > FLAC (level 8)
Taper 2:   Dionyzus
Location: Section 111 (Geddy stage side)
Lineage:  Tascam DR-05 > Audacity > WAV > Trader's Little Helper > FLAC

Tuesday, May 05, 2015

Led Zeppelin - 1973-05-05 - Tampa

Led Zeppelin
1973-05-05
Tampa Stadium
Tampa, FL


 

101. Rock And Roll
102. Celebration Day
103. Black Dog
104. Over The Hills And Far Away
105. Misty Mountain Hop
106. Since I've Been Loving You
201. No Quarter
202. The Song Remains The Same
203. The Rain Song
204. Dazed And Confused
205. Stairway To Heaven
301. Moby Dick
302. Heartbreaker
303. Whole Lotta Love
304. The Ocean
305. Communication Breakdown



News report:
LED ZEPPELIN BREAKS ATTENDANCE RECORD AS WELL AS AN OLD BARRIER OF SILENCE
Record-breaking tour audiences and grosses have been claimed by a lot of rock groups - Beatles, Rolling Stones, Three Dog Night, Grand Funk Railroad. Now Led Zeppelin is claiming one - biggest audience for one act ever in the United States.
This was May 5 at the Tampa Stadium, the night after the British group started its U.S. tour in Atlanta. Attendance in Tampa was 56,800, with a $309,000 gross. Led Zeppelin is on a 33-concert, 30-city tour during May and July, with June off for vacation, expecting a total gross of $3 million. The quartet performs without an opening act or intermission, for two and a half hours.
But if anybody thinks they're blasé about playing to such a big crowd as in Tampa, 'he's wrong. We spoke later by phone with lead singer Robert Plant in New Orleans. He said, "I think it was the biggest thrill I've had. I pretend - I kid myself — I'm not very nervous in a situation like that. I try to bounce around just like normal.
"But, if you do a proportionate thing, it would be like halt of England's population. "It was a real surprise. Tampa is the last place I would expect to see 60,000 people. It's not the country's biggest city. It was fantastic. One would think it would be very hard to communicate; with 60,000 people some have got to be quite a distance off. There were no movie screens showing us, like in Atlanta. The only thing they could pick on was the complete vibe of what music was being done."
Plant and Page write most of the group's songs. Some are a collaboration of all four. Gold albums have been "Led Zeppelin," "Led Zeppelin II," "Led Zeppelin III" and "Houses of the Holy," Atlantic, the latter being the best-selling album in the U.S. tor the first two weeks of May. The group also has a gold single, "Whole Lotta Love." But singles are not a big item with Led Zeppelin.
"You can't pick up on what we do in three minutes." Plant adds that some people thought the group was heavy, sexy rock from its hit single. "Now I think they realize there is more. They realize we have subtlety and a spectrum. You can't keep sending out heavy rock all the lime.
"Every time we make an album, our musical leanings advance more and more. A person won't be repetitious if he has any artistry at all. It sounds egotistical but I think this group has the most talented musicians in England. Jimmy Page has played backup with innumerable people from Burt Bacharach to the Rolling Stones.
"He is like the father of the group. Bassist John Paul Jones has done arrangements for people who are world-famous. I came roaring out of the blues and drummer John Bonham used to be like me.
“After bashing out infectious rock, we've started to level out into an artistically leaning group. There's been no big hype behind it at all. The music sort of seeped through to people. The first album was sensitive, traditional songs like Joan Baez had done. Since then it has gone from strength to strength. An audience can ever anticipate in advance what our next album will be like.
"Live, we do a lot of improvising. The numbers will be more or less the same numbers, but what goes on inside, apart from the melody lines, will alter each night. There’s a lot of phrase tossing between drummer, bassist and guitarist and I've been renowned for using my voice as an instrument.
"A lot of groups are too frightened to play away from the track of the records. You see them twice and know exactly what you'll hear the third time. And it's the reason why our group has never changed personnel.
A lot of groups pack it up and form again. There's internal strife because of musical boredom — plugging away at the same old thing. We stay creative: I think that is exactly what we're known for." (A.P. - May 1973)



The first recording of the band's record-breaking 1973 North American tour begins with an announcer saying simply "ladies and gentlemen, what more can I say... Led Zeppelin." As the band performs a brief soundcheck, Plant announces "it seems between us we've done somethin' nobody's done before... and that's fantastic" referring to tonight's show breaking the attendance record previously held by The Beatles for their concert at Shea Stadium in 1965.
The show gets off to a bit of a sluggish start with Rock and Roll. Page's fingers get stuck in the strings during the guitar solo. The finale leads directly into the first appearance of Celebration Day since 6/9/1972. Page's guitar solo is underscored by some excellent funky fretwork from Jones. The familiar Out on the Tiles intro to Black Dog has been dropped in favor of the riff from Bring it on Home. Plant demands "louder!" during his call and response with the crowd. The non-stop pace doesn't let up as the finale immediately gives way to Page's intro to Over the Hills and Far Away. Plant's voice is quite rough, having lost the momentum gained a month earlier in Paris. Page gets ahead of the band at the end of the guitar solo, creating a funky new arrangement. As the song ends, Plant asks the crowd "did anybody ever make the Orlando gig that we did last time?" adding "so we're in the same country, yeah?"

The crowd becomes restless during a laid-back Since I've Been Loving You, with a few people near the taper repeatedly shouting at those in front of them to sit down. Plant pleads with the crowd to ease up on the barriers before introducing the first appearance of No Quarter. One particularly agitated gentleman near the taper shouts quite angrily "sit your asses down goddammit!" during the first verse. As the song ends, Plant introduces "the mighty John Paul Jones on synthesized piano!"
Before Dazed and Confused, Plant warns "we want this to be a really joyous occasion, I gotta tell you this because three people have been taken to hospital and if you keep pushin' on that barrier, there's gonna be stacks and stacks of people goin'... so for goodness sake, we are animals, but we can move back a little bit." Page shreds through the first guitar solo. The workout section is a bit disjointed. The outro starts out promising with Page soloing wildly over Bonzo's syncopated rhythms, but everything falls apart when the band can't decide how to end the song. Plant tells the crowd "I've joined the Temperance Society where I no longer drink beer... I just drink lemons and honeys" before Stairway to Heaven.
Prior to the first appearance of Moby Dick since 10/9/1972, Plant announces "and now for something entirely different... for the tenth time in United States of America, ladies and gentlemen... for the tenth time in five years, we bring you our percussionist... John Henry Bonham, Moby Dick!" As the drum solo ends, the band skips the return of the main riff, jumping directly into Heartbreaker. Page blazes through the solos. The band skips the final verse, heading straight into Whole Lotta Love at the end of the guitar solo. The Everybody Needs Somebody to Love section has been dropped entirely from the new stripped-down arrangement. Plant once again makes mention of the record-breaking crowd during his boogie rap, saying "fifty-seven thousand people is four thousand more than the people that were at The Beatles' Shea Stadium, gotta boogie!" The medley has been stripped of its classics, leaving only the Boogie Chillen' jam.


The Ocean is preceded by the first appearance of Bonzo's signature count-in. Plant sings the verses out of order, causing a bit of confused hesitation. The band returns to close the show with Communication Breakdown. As they exit the stage, Plant leaves the crowd with a simple "goodnight."